yellowbear

27 Oct 2019 46 views
 
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photoblog image Edvin Loach

Edvin Loach

here are two churches in Edvin Loach, the old ruin (now in the care of English Heritage) and a few yards away the current church built in Victorian times.  They are perched on the hilltop at the highest point in the parish which commands fine views of Clee Hill and the Long Mynd to the north and the Malvern Hills to the south.  Visitors frequently leave comments on the splendour and peace of the site.
The Saxo-Norman church of St. Giles was built in the mid-1000s, lying just inside the inner bailey of the Norman ‘bailey and motte’ castle.  A painting of 1851 displayed just outside the ruin shows it late in its life. A big lintel stone is said to be a sacred relic.  Originally the church had no tower, which was added in the 1500’s, and only two very narrow Norman windows. After complaints from a rector with failing eyesight in 1663 a third was installed.  The big square windows of which traces remain were added in the 1700s.  Once services moved to the new church,  the old  building rapidly declined, and probably would have disappeared by now had not English Heritage, following a local initiative, stepped in to the rescue in 1970.


The new church was designed by the most renowned architect of the time Sir George Gilbert Scott, in the Victorian gothic style of which he was champion.  It was paid for by the local landlords, the Barneby family of Saltmarshe Castle (which was pulled down in 1953).   The church is notable for its light and airy atmosphere created by the high roof and the whitened walls and ceiling showing through the scissor beam  structure, also for the two enormous columns which, unusually, support the east side of the steeple.

 

Sadly the new church was locked so I was not able to look inside 

Edvin Loach

here are two churches in Edvin Loach, the old ruin (now in the care of English Heritage) and a few yards away the current church built in Victorian times.  They are perched on the hilltop at the highest point in the parish which commands fine views of Clee Hill and the Long Mynd to the north and the Malvern Hills to the south.  Visitors frequently leave comments on the splendour and peace of the site.
The Saxo-Norman church of St. Giles was built in the mid-1000s, lying just inside the inner bailey of the Norman ‘bailey and motte’ castle.  A painting of 1851 displayed just outside the ruin shows it late in its life. A big lintel stone is said to be a sacred relic.  Originally the church had no tower, which was added in the 1500’s, and only two very narrow Norman windows. After complaints from a rector with failing eyesight in 1663 a third was installed.  The big square windows of which traces remain were added in the 1700s.  Once services moved to the new church,  the old  building rapidly declined, and probably would have disappeared by now had not English Heritage, following a local initiative, stepped in to the rescue in 1970.


The new church was designed by the most renowned architect of the time Sir George Gilbert Scott, in the Victorian gothic style of which he was champion.  It was paid for by the local landlords, the Barneby family of Saltmarshe Castle (which was pulled down in 1953).   The church is notable for its light and airy atmosphere created by the high roof and the whitened walls and ceiling showing through the scissor beam  structure, also for the two enormous columns which, unusually, support the east side of the steeple.

 

Sadly the new church was locked so I was not able to look inside 

comments (8)

Joli montage, j'aime tous les détails.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 27 Oct 2019, 00:51
This is a fine collection, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Ray. It is a lovely place
  • Chris
  • England
  • 27 Oct 2019, 06:26
Thank you for this, it is all most agreeable

I had a nightmare last night, that Mr Pig had returned to these hallowed portals. Clearly this was, as I said, a nightmare..
Bill Phillips: That is only slightly more likely than Bojo saying something stupid
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 27 Oct 2019, 07:30
That herring-bone work is very ancient. Did you see the lintel stone?
Bill Phillips: I don't recall Lisl.
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 27 Oct 2019, 10:40
Centre right and bottom right appeal to me in particular.
Bill Phillips: Jolly good comrade
I like the detail of the stone and metals.
Bill Phillips: You are of similar opinion to Richard Trim
A fine collage and I did enjoy reading the notes of its history. It always seems to me where Victorian churches are concerned that Gilbert Scott was involved in the design of a great number of them, I have come across quite a few on my travels.
Bill Phillips: He was a leading light
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 29 Oct 2019, 02:16
wonderful background on these church houses

i like the way you've displayed them
Bill Phillips: Thanks sherri. This is a lovely part of Herefordshire

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