yellowbear

09 Jun 2019 225 views
 
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photoblog image Weekend Rubbish 4

Weekend Rubbish 4

Weekend Rubbish 4



comments (8)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 9 Jun 2019, 06:52
The wooden pallet: a packaging commodity used extensively during the 20th century and still going strong today. But where did the pallet originate? How did they come into existence?

Historically timber has been used to transport goods from the far reaches of the world in the form of wooden crates, barrels, kegs and boxes. However, in the 1920s the first wooden skids were introduced, in essence a precursor to a closely boarded top deck of a modern day pallet.

Almost 40 years before the appearance of wooden skids in American factories, low lift trucks had been produced and in 1915 this concept was developed to a high fork lift truck resembling the machinery we see today. These machines helped to increase the volumes and variety of goods that could be handled, developing more efficient storage in warehouses.

It was officially in 1925 when the modern wooden pallet was born. The development of fork lift trucks evolved the design of wooden skids to include blocks and boards creating adequate spaces for fork tines to be carefully inserted. The increased number of boards improved the distribution of weight and in turn decreased product damage
Bill Phillips: Thank you for this fascinating history. I once worked for a company called Covpak. They invented a type of package which was in essence a corrugated cardboard box with a built in pallet. It was a very successful. The company no longer exists as far as I know but the boxes live onhttp://www.ithonsi-packaging.co.za/products/covpack_style_stock_boxes.html
I suppose it is cheaper to create new pallets rather than repairing the old ones.... But the world needs far more trees to absorb CO2.
Bill Phillips: There are companies who repair pallets comrade.
Some good scrap wood in there!
Bill Phillips: Certainly is. Hopefully it will be reused
Fascinating stuff from Chris - I imagine these could be worth a few bob??
Bill Phillips: Most of them look reusable Tom
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Jun 2019, 21:04
The basis of many a good bonfire.
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 9 Jun 2019, 21:07
and now people are repurposing these palettes for many interesting things
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 10 Jun 2019, 09:41
At least you wont be cold..
I bet some enterprising individual could build something functional from this weekend rubbish, Bill.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera X-A3
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/60s
aperture f/5.0
sensitivity ISO3200
focal length 35.5mm
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