yellowbear

07 Apr 2019 43 views
 
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photoblog image The pepper pot Upton upon Severn

The pepper pot Upton upon Severn

The main body of the Tower is probably fourteenth century, although its base is thirteenth century and it is possible that an even earlier wooden structure of Saxon foundation once stood on the site. 

The medieval church is generally thought to have been founded by the Boteler family and was dedicated to St Peter and St Paul. It was built in the Early English style and had a spire and two chancels, one for the parson and one for the parishioners. 

On 29 August 1651, considerable damage was done to the church when it was held by Commonwealth troops against the Royalists during the Battle of Upton, one of the bravest actions of the Civil War. The defeat of the Royalists and the consequent loss of the important river crossing put Charles II at a serious strategic disadvantage, and he was to be defeated shortly afterwards at the Battle of Worcester. 

The church continued to deteriorate and it was not until 1754 that it was decided to erect a new nave in the then currently fashionable classical style. The new building was simple, with roundheaded windows with semicircular openings above, a tiled roof behind a tall parapet and a small projecting chancel with a Venetian east window. In 1770 the spire of the old tower was considered unsafe and it was replaced by the wooden hexagonal lantern and lead cupola (later sheathed in copper) to the design of Midland architect Anthony Keck, giving the Tower its 'pepperpot' proportions.

 

By the nineteenth century the church had become too small and a Neo-Gothic replacement was built at the end of Old Street, completed in 1879. The nave of the old church was eventually dismantled in 1937 and the churchyard was laid out as a garden. In 1953 the church was declared an Ancient Monument.

 

We will be at my brother's today celebrating their golden wedding

The pepper pot Upton upon Severn

The main body of the Tower is probably fourteenth century, although its base is thirteenth century and it is possible that an even earlier wooden structure of Saxon foundation once stood on the site. 

The medieval church is generally thought to have been founded by the Boteler family and was dedicated to St Peter and St Paul. It was built in the Early English style and had a spire and two chancels, one for the parson and one for the parishioners. 

On 29 August 1651, considerable damage was done to the church when it was held by Commonwealth troops against the Royalists during the Battle of Upton, one of the bravest actions of the Civil War. The defeat of the Royalists and the consequent loss of the important river crossing put Charles II at a serious strategic disadvantage, and he was to be defeated shortly afterwards at the Battle of Worcester. 

The church continued to deteriorate and it was not until 1754 that it was decided to erect a new nave in the then currently fashionable classical style. The new building was simple, with roundheaded windows with semicircular openings above, a tiled roof behind a tall parapet and a small projecting chancel with a Venetian east window. In 1770 the spire of the old tower was considered unsafe and it was replaced by the wooden hexagonal lantern and lead cupola (later sheathed in copper) to the design of Midland architect Anthony Keck, giving the Tower its 'pepperpot' proportions.

 

By the nineteenth century the church had become too small and a Neo-Gothic replacement was built at the end of Old Street, completed in 1879. The nave of the old church was eventually dismantled in 1937 and the churchyard was laid out as a garden. In 1953 the church was declared an Ancient Monument.

 

We will be at my brother's today celebrating their golden wedding

comments (11)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 7 Apr 2019, 00:39
I doubt that clock will fall over any time soon, Bill.
Bill Phillips: I am hopeful that the will prove to be the case Ray
Très jolie tour.
Bill Phillips: It is rather nice
a beautiful day to be out and about, Bill, although not many people are seen - still early?
Bill Phillips: This was in the afternoon as I recall Ayush but it was quiet in the town
It's a very handsome building
Bill Phillips: I used to work in Upton years ago and drove past this every day and never really noticed it!
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 7 Apr 2019, 06:56
An interesting history and a fine monument. It certainly dominates the buildings opposite.
Bill Phillips: I used to work in Upton years ago and drove past this every day and never really noticed it!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 7 Apr 2019, 07:08
A delightful image of a charming little town. Your X-A3 is something you're going to enjoy using
Bill Phillips: I am well pleased with it. The lack of a viewfinder is a downside but at least the screen articulates. The colour rendition of the Fuji is excellent
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 7 Apr 2019, 07:13
What a wonderful, bright day - a beautiful tower!
Bill Phillips: It was a lovely day. I worked in Upton for a few years. It is a nice little town
Not a place I know but they do have a lovely church.
Bill Phillips: Nice little town. The smallest in Worcestershire with a well regarded jazz festival
It stands proud against that magnificent blue sky, Bill.
Congrats to your brother and his wife on this important milestone.
Bill Phillips: It was a lovely gathering and a simple celebration as my brother is not in good health
Certainly demands to be center of attention.
Bill Phillips: It does indeed Mary
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 8 Apr 2019, 21:57
such a feeling of simplicity and yet such a wealth of treasured history
Bill Phillips: Yes that sums it up well Sherri

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