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03 Mar 2019 183 views
 
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photoblog image Holy Trinity Church Eckington

Holy Trinity Church Eckington

EXTERIOR: The Perpendicular 3-stage tower has set-back buttresses in the lower 2 stages, and an embattled parapet. In the lower stage is a blocked chamfered south doorway and 3-light west window. The second stage has a west clock-face and small south window, and in the upper stage are 2-light bell openings. The tower projects in front of the nave west wall, which has a C12 doorway relocated here in 1831 from the north wall when the aisle was built. It has nook shafts with foliage capitals, and round arch with chevrons. Above it is a C19 4-light Perpendicular window that appears to have replaced C13 lancet windows. On its left side one C13 window, with billet frieze on the label, has survived (another is visible internally, blocked by the tower). The south aisle has three 2-light Decorated windows of 1869 and pair of C13 cusped lights in the east wall, which are offset from the centre and show that the aisle was originally narrower. The north aisle is 3 buttressed bays with pointed windows, of which the outer bays retain Gothic iron-frame glazing bars. The aisle was extended westwards in ashlar in 1836 by building a 2-bay buttressed Tudor-Gothic school room with moulded eaves cornice. It has 2-light square-headed north windows. Its west front comprises 3-light Perpendicular window over a studded door under a square label, with carved spandrels, and is intended to balance the tower on the south side of the nave. The chancel has diagonal buttresses. In the south wall are 2 large single-light windows and a low priest's doorway with large lintel. The 3-light east window has cusped ogee lights, and on the north side is one 2-light Decorated window. The organ chamber has a parapet concealing the roof, and obscures a blocked east doorway in the north aisle. 

INTERIOR: The tower has C15 north and east arches with continuous hollow mouldings and semi-circular responds. The embrasure of a C13 west window is obscured by the stair turret. In the outer north-east angle looking into the nave is a statue niche under an ogee canopy. The 3-bay late C12 south arcade has round piers, scalloped capitals and stepped round arches. The north arcade is an 1887 copy of the south. The wide chancel arch is C19, with semi-circular responds, stepped arch and label with billet frieze. The nave roof is mostly medieval work but was restored in the C19, and includes richly carved beams and braces. Three trusses on corbelled posts have tie and collar beams, of which the latter are strengthened by arched braces. Alternate collar-beam trusses are closed with blind tracery above the collars. The south-aisle roof of 1928 has tie beams with raking struts, on corbelled brackets. The north aisle has a canted plaster ceiling with moulded ribs, and moulded cornice on the south side only. The chancel roof is a canted boarded ceiling with 2 castellated tie beams and similar detail to moulded cornices. Walls have been stripped of plaster. Nave and aisle floors have stone paving, black and red tiles, and grave slabs in the nave of the period 1700-1845. Beneath the benches are wood-block floors. The chancel is stone-paved.

Holy Trinity Church Eckington

EXTERIOR: The Perpendicular 3-stage tower has set-back buttresses in the lower 2 stages, and an embattled parapet. In the lower stage is a blocked chamfered south doorway and 3-light west window. The second stage has a west clock-face and small south window, and in the upper stage are 2-light bell openings. The tower projects in front of the nave west wall, which has a C12 doorway relocated here in 1831 from the north wall when the aisle was built. It has nook shafts with foliage capitals, and round arch with chevrons. Above it is a C19 4-light Perpendicular window that appears to have replaced C13 lancet windows. On its left side one C13 window, with billet frieze on the label, has survived (another is visible internally, blocked by the tower). The south aisle has three 2-light Decorated windows of 1869 and pair of C13 cusped lights in the east wall, which are offset from the centre and show that the aisle was originally narrower. The north aisle is 3 buttressed bays with pointed windows, of which the outer bays retain Gothic iron-frame glazing bars. The aisle was extended westwards in ashlar in 1836 by building a 2-bay buttressed Tudor-Gothic school room with moulded eaves cornice. It has 2-light square-headed north windows. Its west front comprises 3-light Perpendicular window over a studded door under a square label, with carved spandrels, and is intended to balance the tower on the south side of the nave. The chancel has diagonal buttresses. In the south wall are 2 large single-light windows and a low priest's doorway with large lintel. The 3-light east window has cusped ogee lights, and on the north side is one 2-light Decorated window. The organ chamber has a parapet concealing the roof, and obscures a blocked east doorway in the north aisle. 

INTERIOR: The tower has C15 north and east arches with continuous hollow mouldings and semi-circular responds. The embrasure of a C13 west window is obscured by the stair turret. In the outer north-east angle looking into the nave is a statue niche under an ogee canopy. The 3-bay late C12 south arcade has round piers, scalloped capitals and stepped round arches. The north arcade is an 1887 copy of the south. The wide chancel arch is C19, with semi-circular responds, stepped arch and label with billet frieze. The nave roof is mostly medieval work but was restored in the C19, and includes richly carved beams and braces. Three trusses on corbelled posts have tie and collar beams, of which the latter are strengthened by arched braces. Alternate collar-beam trusses are closed with blind tracery above the collars. The south-aisle roof of 1928 has tie beams with raking struts, on corbelled brackets. The north aisle has a canted plaster ceiling with moulded ribs, and moulded cornice on the south side only. The chancel roof is a canted boarded ceiling with 2 castellated tie beams and similar detail to moulded cornices. Walls have been stripped of plaster. Nave and aisle floors have stone paving, black and red tiles, and grave slabs in the nave of the period 1700-1845. Beneath the benches are wood-block floors. The chancel is stone-paved.

comments (6)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 3 Mar 2019, 06:59
Blimey you're such a student of church architecture Bill..
Bill Phillips: Pure research old fruit
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Mar 2019, 07:05
Yes of course, I knew all that information. The perpendicular tower gives the impression of having a slight lean.
Bill Phillips: I think the whole thing has been distorted by the 10mm lens and my effort to rectify that has failed miserably
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 3 Mar 2019, 07:19
First I thought to be on Alan's blog - what a lovely day to see this stabile church with its churchyard!
Bill Phillips: Sadly the church was locked Philine. A good friend of mine has his final resting place here
Beautiful stone!
Bill Phillips: Yes it is 'Tom
It is a fine church, what a shame it was locked.
Bill Phillips: Indeed Brian but it is all too often the way
everything in this shot looks a bit crooked Bill but i love the shadows....petersmile
Bill Phillips: It is a terrible picture Peter grin

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera PENTAX K-3 II
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/60s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 10.0mm
Really?Really?
Leamington ...the posh endLeamington ...th...
Lots of colourLots of colour

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