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09 Oct 2018 73 views
 
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photoblog image A once historic hospital

A once historic hospital

 

 

The British Medical Association was founded as the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association (PMSA) by Sir Charles Hastings on 19 July 1832 at a meeting in the Board Room of the Worcester Infirmary.This is now the site of the University of Worcester's City Campus. An audience of 50 doctors was present to hear Hastings propose the inauguration of an Association both friendly and scientific for the sharing of knowledge between doctors. Ten years after its initial meeting the association’s membership had grown to 1350 and it had begun to publish a weekly journal, The Provincial Medical and Surgical Journal, known from 1857 as the British Medical Journal or BMJ. The association’s membership grew rapidly and in 1853 the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association extended its membership to London doctors and became the British Medical Association in 1856. Medical students have been admitted from the late 1970s onwards.

Although not initially formed with the aim of initiating medical reform, the BMA played a key role in the drafting and passing of the Medical Act 1858, which established the General Medical Council and set a standard for qualified and unqualified doctors and established a system of professional regulation. Prior to this anyone, qualified or not, could practice as a doctor. This also positioned the BMA to play a major role in future medical politics, campaigning on issues such as Poor Law Medicine, quackery, public health, alternative and military medicine, and contract practice. During this time one of the most active and influential of the association’s bodies was the Parliamentary Bills Committee, formed in 1863 to take a leading role in influencing legislation on public health matters.

A once historic hospital

 

 

The British Medical Association was founded as the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association (PMSA) by Sir Charles Hastings on 19 July 1832 at a meeting in the Board Room of the Worcester Infirmary.This is now the site of the University of Worcester's City Campus. An audience of 50 doctors was present to hear Hastings propose the inauguration of an Association both friendly and scientific for the sharing of knowledge between doctors. Ten years after its initial meeting the association’s membership had grown to 1350 and it had begun to publish a weekly journal, The Provincial Medical and Surgical Journal, known from 1857 as the British Medical Journal or BMJ. The association’s membership grew rapidly and in 1853 the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association extended its membership to London doctors and became the British Medical Association in 1856. Medical students have been admitted from the late 1970s onwards.

Although not initially formed with the aim of initiating medical reform, the BMA played a key role in the drafting and passing of the Medical Act 1858, which established the General Medical Council and set a standard for qualified and unqualified doctors and established a system of professional regulation. Prior to this anyone, qualified or not, could practice as a doctor. This also positioned the BMA to play a major role in future medical politics, campaigning on issues such as Poor Law Medicine, quackery, public health, alternative and military medicine, and contract practice. During this time one of the most active and influential of the association’s bodies was the Parliamentary Bills Committee, formed in 1863 to take a leading role in influencing legislation on public health matters.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 9 Oct 2018, 00:43
I is an attractively arranged pile of bricks, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Those Victorians built things to last Ray
I can hear the screams of the victims/patients that were looked after here. It's amazing how far we've come. What a cool looking edifice.
Bill Phillips: We have come a long way. There is now a brand new purpose built hospital which isn't big enough and has totally inadequate parking on the outskirts of the city
Quel magnifique bâtiment !
Bill Phillips: It is very handsome Martine
What a great history this handsome building has!
Bill Phillips: Happily it has been retained and not just demolished like so much of historic Worcester was in the 1960s
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 9 Oct 2018, 06:25
Is this still a hospital or, as it would he hereabouts, converted into very expensive apartments?
Bill Phillips: It is now the City campus of the University of Worcester. I think the business school is based here training the next generation of executives to run British companies into the ground grin
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 9 Oct 2018, 07:18
It looks a bit forbidding like those Victorian lunatic asylums.
Bill Phillips: It has the look of an institution, now it is full of students so you might be right
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Oct 2018, 07:31
a very impressive building - still a hospital?
Bill Phillips: It is now the City campus of the University of Worcester. I believe the business school is based here
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Oct 2018, 07:51
Oh, now I remember to have seen this building as you guided me through Worcester.
Bill Phillips: Indeed. At that time it was still being converted I think
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 9 Oct 2018, 08:19
It looks like a Workhouse, Bill
Bill Phillips: It does rather Lisl. The chapel at the back is rather lovely inside
A typical magnificent looking Victorian building, good to read it is still in use.
Bill Phillips: It would have been a disgrace to have demolished it.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 9 Oct 2018, 17:23
Fascinating to read that; sounds like the end of the days for "Sawbones". The building with a domed end looks rather like a chapel.In latter years, out would have had matrons on the wards and nurses wearing proper uniforms.
Bill Phillips: It is a chapel and is named after Jenny Lind ...the Swedish Nightingale.
it is a magnificent old building Bill and i'm glad that they are still putting it to use it....petersmile
Bill Phillips: It would have been a disaster had it been totally demolished Peter
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 9 Oct 2018, 20:48
it's always good to have qualifying standards for medical doctors

i can't imagine the atrocities that went on before that, seeing that some quacks are still able to fly under the radar in our present age

what a fine structure it is and a privilege to view it through your lens

love, love that chevron pattern
Bill Phillips: The men who started the British medical association left a fine legacy Sherri
A beautiful building but with a slighly threatening look. But at least it is still in use, so presumably well maintained.
Bill Phillips: It is a busy part of the university Sheila and also houses a medical museum

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