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07 Jun 2018 85 views
 
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photoblog image A visit to Tewkesbury 6

A visit to Tewkesbury 6

For those of you who didn't know what my picture on May 29th was.....pause while you look back. Assuming you care it was a bit of this wonderful heating contraption 

 

Here is some more info

 

Goldsworthy Gurney (later Sir) was born in Cornwall in 1793. In 1814, he settled in Cambourne where he practised as a surgeon, moving to London in 1820 and developing his interest in engineering. In 1825 he patented a steam carriage, going on in 1842 to patent a system of heat recovery from lighting fittings. In 1852, Gurney was appointed to investigate the ventilation problems in the House of Commons where he flashed off large quantities of gunpowder in the chamber to observe the motion of the air currents, He was said to have posed a greater risk than Guy Fawkes!

His interest in heating led him to invent a new type of warm-air stove, which he patented in 1856 as ‘Certain Improvements in warming and moistening air’. The apparatus was described as a metallic vessel having a number of plates extending from its outer surface, standing with the plates vertical in a shallow trough of water. This was significant in attempting to provide humidification to offset the drying feeling caused by warm air. He soon after sold the rights for his invention to the London Warming & Ventilating Company which advertised itself as ‘Proprietors of the Gurney stove’ and remained active in the 1950s.

The stove was made in three sizes, the largest being 1 m in diameter with a 1.8 m diameter base and of 2.7 m high. It consumed about 200 kg of coke a week and was said to be capable a heating a space of 120 000 ft3. It was very heavy, at a time when there was a popular belief that heat output depended on the mass of metal in the stove.

By 1897 (the year of the founding of the IHVE) a London Warming advertisement claimed ‘over 10 000 churches, schools, government and other public and private buildings successfully warmed by our system’. This included some 22 cathedrals; working examples (converted from solid fuel) can still be seen in Hereford, Chester and Ely Cathedrals and in Tewkesbury Abbey.

A visit to Tewkesbury 6

For those of you who didn't know what my picture on May 29th was.....pause while you look back. Assuming you care it was a bit of this wonderful heating contraption 

 

Here is some more info

 

Goldsworthy Gurney (later Sir) was born in Cornwall in 1793. In 1814, he settled in Cambourne where he practised as a surgeon, moving to London in 1820 and developing his interest in engineering. In 1825 he patented a steam carriage, going on in 1842 to patent a system of heat recovery from lighting fittings. In 1852, Gurney was appointed to investigate the ventilation problems in the House of Commons where he flashed off large quantities of gunpowder in the chamber to observe the motion of the air currents, He was said to have posed a greater risk than Guy Fawkes!

His interest in heating led him to invent a new type of warm-air stove, which he patented in 1856 as ‘Certain Improvements in warming and moistening air’. The apparatus was described as a metallic vessel having a number of plates extending from its outer surface, standing with the plates vertical in a shallow trough of water. This was significant in attempting to provide humidification to offset the drying feeling caused by warm air. He soon after sold the rights for his invention to the London Warming & Ventilating Company which advertised itself as ‘Proprietors of the Gurney stove’ and remained active in the 1950s.

The stove was made in three sizes, the largest being 1 m in diameter with a 1.8 m diameter base and of 2.7 m high. It consumed about 200 kg of coke a week and was said to be capable a heating a space of 120 000 ft3. It was very heavy, at a time when there was a popular belief that heat output depended on the mass of metal in the stove.

By 1897 (the year of the founding of the IHVE) a London Warming advertisement claimed ‘over 10 000 churches, schools, government and other public and private buildings successfully warmed by our system’. This included some 22 cathedrals; working examples (converted from solid fuel) can still be seen in Hereford, Chester and Ely Cathedrals and in Tewkesbury Abbey.

comments (16)

A remarkable piece of engineering that makes a good photo, Bill.
Bill Phillips: They are interesting things. I had seen them before but never really gave them any thought
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 7 Jun 2018, 03:03
an amazing background

love the patterns here and whenever typography is involved that's an added bonus
Bill Phillips: The victorians built things to impress and last
Very cool!!!
Bill Phillips: Hopefully very warm E
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 7 Jun 2018, 06:43
This is a very interesting engineering! I was in Hereford, Chester and Ely Cathedrals, but I never these elegant pieces of the Warming & Ventilation Company.
Bill Phillips: You will have to keep an eye out for them Philine
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 7 Jun 2018, 06:44
I have seen examples in churches myself. Well I guess they work well..
Bill Phillips: They were certainly built to last and the fact that they have been converted to gas suggests they work well
  • Astrid
  • Nederland
  • 7 Jun 2018, 07:13
I have seen one of those stoves in England, very impressive, Bill.
Bill Phillips: They are Astrid. A great piece of Victorian engineering
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 7 Jun 2018, 07:51
There.. I said it looked like some sort of furnace. What's my prize? What a wonderful contraption.
Bill Phillips: I will ask Ange to make you a scone next time you visit Droitwich
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 7 Jun 2018, 08:10
Beyond guessing, Bill
Bill Phillips: It is a fine contraption though
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 7 Jun 2018, 11:37
The contraption is a work of art Bill, well photographed.
Bill Phillips: I am obliged to you
Like Chris I've come across these things in churches where they are still in use.
Bill Phillips: They are quite something!
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 7 Jun 2018, 15:22
What a lovely piece of engineering.
Bill Phillips: Classic Victorian
ah, so this is what it was. and these cooling fins are so widely used now in heat transfer applications. i am quite impressed by his switch from surgery to an engineering patent, Bill
Bill Phillips: Our Victorian forebears were versatile Ayush grin
I do believe I've seen one of these somewhere - but I can't remember where!
Bill Phillips: I think there are still some in churches around the country apart from the cathedrals mentioned in the text tom
In fact I was wondering what it was, then I read the spiagazioni, an ancestor of the radiator. I think,
Bill Phillips: To some extent, but also designed to moisten the air
i take it that this is a Gurney stove Bill... it sure looks cool and it gave you a great picture....petersmile
Bill Phillips: One of his finest Peter
Excellent monument for sure.
Bill Phillips: A grand old thing

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera PENTAX K-3 II
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/8s
aperture f/4.5
sensitivity ISO3200
focal length 90.0mm
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