yellowbear

02 May 2018 61 views
 
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photoblog image It is all cobblers to me

It is all cobblers to me

The term "cordwainer" is an Anglicization of the French word cordonnier, which means shoemaker, introduced into the English language after the Norman invasion in 1066.

 

Since the Middle Ages the title of cordwainer has been selected by the shoemakers and used loosely. Generally it refered to a certain class of boot and shoemakers. The first English guild who called themselves cordwainers was founded at Oxford in 1131. "Cordwainers" was also the choice of the London shoemakers, who organized a guild before 1160, and the Worshipful Company of Cordwainers has used this title since receiving its first Ordinances in 1272.

 

The first English cordwainers, or shoemakers, landed at Jamestown, Virginia, established in 1607-- the first permanent English settlement on this continent, from which began the overseas expansion of the English-speaking peoples, the earliest outpost of the British Empire and the first beginnings of the United States of America..  This historic adventure of settlement was in part supported by investments made by the London cordwainers.

 

Shoemakers, tanners, and other tradesmen arrived in Jamestown by 1610, and the secretary of Virginia recorded flourishing shoe and leather trades there by 1616. 

 

A distinction preserved by cordwainers since the earliest times is, that a cordwainer works only with new leather, whereas a cobbler works with old. Cobblers have always been repairers, frequently prohibited by law from making shoes.

It is all cobblers to me

The term "cordwainer" is an Anglicization of the French word cordonnier, which means shoemaker, introduced into the English language after the Norman invasion in 1066.

 

Since the Middle Ages the title of cordwainer has been selected by the shoemakers and used loosely. Generally it refered to a certain class of boot and shoemakers. The first English guild who called themselves cordwainers was founded at Oxford in 1131. "Cordwainers" was also the choice of the London shoemakers, who organized a guild before 1160, and the Worshipful Company of Cordwainers has used this title since receiving its first Ordinances in 1272.

 

The first English cordwainers, or shoemakers, landed at Jamestown, Virginia, established in 1607-- the first permanent English settlement on this continent, from which began the overseas expansion of the English-speaking peoples, the earliest outpost of the British Empire and the first beginnings of the United States of America..  This historic adventure of settlement was in part supported by investments made by the London cordwainers.

 

Shoemakers, tanners, and other tradesmen arrived in Jamestown by 1610, and the secretary of Virginia recorded flourishing shoe and leather trades there by 1616. 

 

A distinction preserved by cordwainers since the earliest times is, that a cordwainer works only with new leather, whereas a cobbler works with old. Cobblers have always been repairers, frequently prohibited by law from making shoes.

comments (16)

  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 2 May 2018, 00:58
Dis lane got pipeage...
Bill Phillips: It sure has
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 2 May 2018, 01:07
i loved reading the history about cobblers and shoemakers

now, it's difficult to find either

really nice photo
Bill Phillips: My Grandfather was a cobbler and I have a photograph of his workshop
This is cobblers then...?
Bill Phillips: Yes a right load of cobblers Frank
Well - I had no idea!
Bill Phillips: To be honest nor had I...and my grandfather was a cobbler!
Je n'aimerais pas trop passer par cette ruelle.
Bill Phillips: You would be perfectly safe Martine
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 2 May 2018, 06:26
I had no idea of the difference between cordwainers and cobblers before now. And how nice that this alleyway retains the vestiges of its history through the name
Bill Phillips: Nor I and my grandfather was a cobbler
That last line..."Cobblers have always been repairers, frequently prohibited by law from making shoes"...totally takes the cake, Bill. As does also, of course, your VPP. smile
Bill Phillips: My Grandfather was a cobbler and had three shoe shops in Lancashire.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 2 May 2018, 06:51
That is quite the education I got here. And right so there should be rules wink...
This is a very nice picture, Bill. Love the sign here.
Bill Phillips: So did I Astrid. My Grandfather was a cobbler and my mother always thought good shoes were important
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 2 May 2018, 07:02
Well, dang me; I always thought that cobblers and cordwainers were one and the same. I've often walked passed the The Worshipful Company of Cordwainers offices in Mincing Lane in the City of London when I was a wage slave. ,
Bill Phillips: Well now you know Alan. My grandfather was a cobbler.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 2 May 2018, 07:13
Well I never knew dat.
Bill Phillips: Nor did I, I suppose I should have done as my Grandfather was a cobbler and had shoe shops oop north
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 2 May 2018, 07:33
I didn't know about the difference between cobblers and cordwainers - the words even sound like what they do
Bill Phillips: They are wonderful words Lisl.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 2 May 2018, 14:32
I see in your picture, they had to translate the word for the English. Allover our fair city, one can still find cobblers; but the cordwainers have done the disappearance act. Or they have become factory line workers, to the extent that they celebrated Labour Day yesterday.

Not many shoemakers could fit into the lane in your picture.
Bill Phillips: There are still some here I guess. They probably make very expensive shoes for the rich.
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 May 2018, 15:32
What an interesting post - I've never heard the word cordwainer, and certainly would never have guessed its shoemaking connection.

As for your title...brilliant!
Bill Phillips: I did know the word but thought it was just a posh word for cobbler!

Pleased you like the title
How interesting and well seen. The last paragraph is very good.
Bill Phillips: It is interesting Mary and I am glad you found it so
That's a new name to me.
Bill Phillips: I knew the name but not all the stuff about them
I wonder where they exhibit the goods smile
Bill Phillips: They probably didn't make other than to order

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