yellowbear

23 Apr 2018 54 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image The Three Choirs Festival

The Three Choirs Festival

The festival, originally held over two days in September (but also held in September in 1933 and 1947, since C. S. Lewis's brother Warren is known to have attended), is one of the world's oldest classical choral music festivals.[3]Publicity for it in 1719 addressed "Members of the yearly Musical Assembly in these parts". Its music obviously tended towards the ecclesiastical. In early gatherings, Purcell's setting of the Te Deum and Jubilate was a regular part of the repertoire until 1784, and Handel dominated 18th-century programmes with oratorios such as Alexander's FeastSamsonJudas Maccabaeus and Messiah. Sir Samuel Hellier, guardian of the Hellier Stradivarius, was a "prominent figure".[4] Haydn's The Creation was heard first in the festival of 1800. From 1840, Mendelssohn's Elijah was performed every year until 1930.

The 19th century saw the introduction of Rossini, Mozart and Beethoven, and the festival's fortunes were enhanced by the arrival of the railways. However, these also brought crowds, a phenomenon not always pleasing to the church authorities, although full seats uplifted the finances. In the 1870s, the festival was reduced to the three cathedral choirs, ending for a while the era of the visiting celebrity singer as a faction in the church sought to stress the "appropriate" nature of activities allowed in cathedrals. However, the civil authorities took issue with the ecclesiastical and the festival revived. Interestingly, works by J. S. Bach were not heard until the 1870s, soon to be followed by local composer Elgar, who began to be featured around the turn of the century and whose works dominated the festival for much of the 20th century as its emphasis shifted toward British musicians. Herbert Sumsion, organist at Gloucester between 1928 and 1967, particularly helped to promote the works of native composers, including premiering works of Howells, Finzi, and others. Parry's compositions were also performed regularly. His De Profundis was one of the earliest works to be commissioned especially for the festival and performed in 1891.

Delius in 1901 was another composer who introduced or conducted new works, with his Dance Rhapsody No. 1. Another was Ralph Vaughan Williams, whose Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis was premiered there in 1910, followed by the Five Mystical Songs in 1911 and the Fantasia on Christmas Carols in 1912, after which he co-featured with Elgar as a central prop to the musical repertoire. Sumsion fostered a relationship with Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály and programmed Kodály's works at six Gloucester festivals. Other names include Gustav Holst, Arthur Sullivan, Herbert Howells, Gerald Finzi, William Walton, Arthur Bliss and Benjamin Britten and recently, Lennox Berkeley, John McCabe, William Mathias, Paul Patterson and James MacMillan.

The Three Choirs Festival

The festival, originally held over two days in September (but also held in September in 1933 and 1947, since C. S. Lewis's brother Warren is known to have attended), is one of the world's oldest classical choral music festivals.[3]Publicity for it in 1719 addressed "Members of the yearly Musical Assembly in these parts". Its music obviously tended towards the ecclesiastical. In early gatherings, Purcell's setting of the Te Deum and Jubilate was a regular part of the repertoire until 1784, and Handel dominated 18th-century programmes with oratorios such as Alexander's FeastSamsonJudas Maccabaeus and Messiah. Sir Samuel Hellier, guardian of the Hellier Stradivarius, was a "prominent figure".[4] Haydn's The Creation was heard first in the festival of 1800. From 1840, Mendelssohn's Elijah was performed every year until 1930.

The 19th century saw the introduction of Rossini, Mozart and Beethoven, and the festival's fortunes were enhanced by the arrival of the railways. However, these also brought crowds, a phenomenon not always pleasing to the church authorities, although full seats uplifted the finances. In the 1870s, the festival was reduced to the three cathedral choirs, ending for a while the era of the visiting celebrity singer as a faction in the church sought to stress the "appropriate" nature of activities allowed in cathedrals. However, the civil authorities took issue with the ecclesiastical and the festival revived. Interestingly, works by J. S. Bach were not heard until the 1870s, soon to be followed by local composer Elgar, who began to be featured around the turn of the century and whose works dominated the festival for much of the 20th century as its emphasis shifted toward British musicians. Herbert Sumsion, organist at Gloucester between 1928 and 1967, particularly helped to promote the works of native composers, including premiering works of Howells, Finzi, and others. Parry's compositions were also performed regularly. His De Profundis was one of the earliest works to be commissioned especially for the festival and performed in 1891.

Delius in 1901 was another composer who introduced or conducted new works, with his Dance Rhapsody No. 1. Another was Ralph Vaughan Williams, whose Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis was premiered there in 1910, followed by the Five Mystical Songs in 1911 and the Fantasia on Christmas Carols in 1912, after which he co-featured with Elgar as a central prop to the musical repertoire. Sumsion fostered a relationship with Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály and programmed Kodály's works at six Gloucester festivals. Other names include Gustav Holst, Arthur Sullivan, Herbert Howells, Gerald Finzi, William Walton, Arthur Bliss and Benjamin Britten and recently, Lennox Berkeley, John McCabe, William Mathias, Paul Patterson and James MacMillan.

comments (19)

  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 23 Apr 2018, 01:20
Nicely composed, Bill.

I love the miracle...you know...the spokeless bicycle wheels!
Bill Phillips: Yet another thing we Brits have given the world Ray
I like your comp - looking over his shoulder to the Cathedral!
Bill Phillips: I liked the idea of old Elgar contemplating the cathedral
Nice P.O.V. Bill.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Frank. I bet it has been done a million times!
You had me at "C.S. Lewis's brother Warren." Definitely delightful because of your POV, Bill.
Bill Phillips: You mean you didn't know he had a brother grin ?
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 23 Apr 2018, 06:43
First I thought the man could be Chris, but seeing the bike I thought of Alan, but seeing Hereford Cathedral I thought of Bill and his love for music!
Bill Phillips: smile It is, as I am sure you know, Sir Edward Elgar Philine
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 23 Apr 2018, 06:52
There are a lot of composers there whose works I would have enjoyed at the festival in days of yore. Your picture is a real delight
Bill Phillips: So would I. I confess i have never been to the three choirs festival
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 23 Apr 2018, 07:17
It’s too early to read all that . The three choirs is quite an institution though.
Bill Phillips: Reading is optional but marvelling at the quality of the snap is compulsory Chad
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk : where the sun rises first in England
  • 23 Apr 2018, 07:52
good bike
Bill Phillips: What do you know about bikes comrade?
Interesting shot, Bill - that's a very unusual bit of sculpture!
Bill Phillips: I suppose Elgar must have cycled to Hereford at some time
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 23 Apr 2018, 13:42
Well, if they have the air raid warden investigating - that couldn't be all that great a festival.
Bill Phillips: Hahahahahahahah
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 23 Apr 2018, 13:50
I always thought I would enjoy attending the Three Choirs Festival. I would not come on such a bike at this, though. Actually, I would not come on any bike!
Bill Phillips: It is something we have never been to and really ought to make the effort when it is next in Worcester!
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 Apr 2018, 14:32
I like your POV and treatment.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Anne. I suspect I am not the first to have taken a snap from this viewpoint!
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 23 Apr 2018, 14:50
This is a wonderful POV, Bill and I love the treatment.
Bill Phillips: As I said to Anne I bet I am not the first to think of it grin
oOu found a very good viewpoint Bill. I can imagine this festival, of which I'd heard of before, must be very good to attend if choral music is ones thing.
Bill Phillips: We have never been and really ought to next time it is in Worcester.
  • Ayush Basu
  • Venlo, Netherlands
  • 23 Apr 2018, 17:40
i like the textures all over this image, Bill and they are very consistent too.
Bill Phillips: Thanks very much Ayush
I like this sculpture very much.
Bill Phillips: It is a fitting tribute to Elgar
I like that mention of Arthur Bliss...
Bill Phillips: Happy to oblige Larry smile
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 24 Apr 2018, 02:22
what an extraordinary and long history attached to this structure

i like how you captured the cathedral from the perspective of the statue; while including it
Bill Phillips: We have many fine old cathedrals Sherri
I like how you set the image, beautiful

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera PENTAX K-3 II
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/100s
aperture f/9.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 20.0mm
Chedworth Roman Villa last of severalChedworth Roman ...
Hereford Town HallHereford Town Ha...
How to eat a sconeHow to eat a sco...

Warning