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20 Nov 2016 78 views
 
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photoblog image St Mary's Huntingfield 3

St Mary's Huntingfield 3

It is natural to speculate about the roof. It is of a single hammer-beam construction, arch-braced principals alternating with hammer-beams ending in carved angels. The angels in the nave carry a crown or a banner, those in the chancel have heraldic shields bearing arms. The question all ask is: are these angels genuinely medieval work which escaped the axes of the post-Reformation Puritans, (and remember that William Dowsing, the arch-destroyer, came from nearby Laxfield) or are they all the handiwork of Victorian craftsmen?

Traditional East Anglian hammer-beam roofs generally terminate in a carving of some sort, and the de la Poles made angel roofs in the churches of their manors, even taking Suffolk carpenters to Ewelme in Oxfordshire to make one there. But our angels are too perfect to be so old. Entries in a tradesman's account of 1865 would seem to settle the matter; or do they?

Mr Spall's extras included 8 angels with expanded wings, Chancel, £12
B. W. Spall, time and materials to preparing and fixing 10 angels, £80

The account does not actually say 'making'.

 

Info all from http://www.stmaryshuntingfield.org.uk/ceiling.htm

St Mary's Huntingfield 3

It is natural to speculate about the roof. It is of a single hammer-beam construction, arch-braced principals alternating with hammer-beams ending in carved angels. The angels in the nave carry a crown or a banner, those in the chancel have heraldic shields bearing arms. The question all ask is: are these angels genuinely medieval work which escaped the axes of the post-Reformation Puritans, (and remember that William Dowsing, the arch-destroyer, came from nearby Laxfield) or are they all the handiwork of Victorian craftsmen?

Traditional East Anglian hammer-beam roofs generally terminate in a carving of some sort, and the de la Poles made angel roofs in the churches of their manors, even taking Suffolk carpenters to Ewelme in Oxfordshire to make one there. But our angels are too perfect to be so old. Entries in a tradesman's account of 1865 would seem to settle the matter; or do they?

Mr Spall's extras included 8 angels with expanded wings, Chancel, £12
B. W. Spall, time and materials to preparing and fixing 10 angels, £80

The account does not actually say 'making'.

 

Info all from http://www.stmaryshuntingfield.org.uk/ceiling.htm

comments (11)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 Nov 2016, 00:28
I think I would be tempted to lay on the floor on my back, and spend an hour looking up, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Getting up again might be tricky
Wow! That's extraordinary!
Bill Phillips: I agree!
  • Martine
  • France
  • 20 Nov 2016, 06:15
Que c'est beau ! J'aime les couleurs de ces décorations.
Bill Phillips: It is beautifully done Martine
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 20 Nov 2016, 07:08
I am enthusiast - what a beautiful ceiling - is there a mirror to be able to observe any detail?
Bill Phillips: I don't recall one Philine
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 Nov 2016, 07:50
Victorian gothic at its finest and most dramatic
Bill Phillips: Wonderful wasn't it?
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 20 Nov 2016, 10:13
This ceiling reminds me a bit of the ceiling in St. Cuthbert's in Wells (15th century), but this Victorian one is quite more colourful.
Bill Phillips: This is Victorian at its finest in my humble opinion Philine
i do like the winged angles and i believe i am seeing such a construction for the first time, Bill.
Bill Phillips: I have posted a couple of snaps of this before I think Ayush
How wonderful are those angels! I like the use of the cobalt blue paint too.
Bill Phillips: They certainly are Mary
A very spectacular roof isn't it, imagine the work that went into all those paintings.
Bill Phillips: It is a staggering feat brian
the decorations are spectacular Philine...
the roof is built like the hull of a wooden ship and many shipbuilders were used to build them...

i posted the following picture of the roof the Tithe Barn, Bradford on Avon upside down as Boat Friday in 2014...

http://petermeilleur.shutterchance.com/image/2014/08/15/boat-friday/

you might get a kick out of seeing it....petersmile
Bill Phillips: There is certainly a similarity!
duh!!...sorry i called you Philine... you took us out to Ironbridge the day after i took that picture Bill....petersmile
Bill Phillips: I remember the picture and mistaking me for Philine is easily done

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