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23 Aug 2016 107 views
 
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photoblog image Packwood House 1 of a lot

Packwood House 1 of a lot

The house began as a modest timber-framed farmhouse constructed for John Fetherston between 1556 and 1560. The last member of the Fetherston family died in 1876.In 1904, and the house was purchased by Birmingham industrialist Alfred Ash. It was inherited by Graham Baron Ash (Baron in this case being a name not a title) in 1925, who spent the following two decades creating a house of Tudor character. He purchased an extensive collection of 16th- and 17th-century furniture, some obtained from nearby Baddesley Clinton. The great barn of the farm was converted into a Tudor-style hall with sprung floor for dancing, and was connected to the main house by the addition of a Long Gallery in 1931

In 1941, Ash donated the house and gardens to the National Trust in memory of his parents but continued to live in the house until 1947 when he moved to Wingfield Castle.

 

Having gone through the visitor centre the shortest route to the house is through the kitchen garden. This crop is not one I have ever associated with kitchen gardens 

Packwood House 1 of a lot

The house began as a modest timber-framed farmhouse constructed for John Fetherston between 1556 and 1560. The last member of the Fetherston family died in 1876.In 1904, and the house was purchased by Birmingham industrialist Alfred Ash. It was inherited by Graham Baron Ash (Baron in this case being a name not a title) in 1925, who spent the following two decades creating a house of Tudor character. He purchased an extensive collection of 16th- and 17th-century furniture, some obtained from nearby Baddesley Clinton. The great barn of the farm was converted into a Tudor-style hall with sprung floor for dancing, and was connected to the main house by the addition of a Long Gallery in 1931

In 1941, Ash donated the house and gardens to the National Trust in memory of his parents but continued to live in the house until 1947 when he moved to Wingfield Castle.

 

Having gone through the visitor centre the shortest route to the house is through the kitchen garden. This crop is not one I have ever associated with kitchen gardens 

comments (17)

  • Martine
  • France
  • 23 Aug 2016, 03:26
Je ne connais pas cette marque de champagne, elle ne doit pas être d'ici.
Bill Phillips: It was founded in 1785 by Florens-Louis Heidsieck. Following the death of the founder in 1828, the successors were his relatives Henri-Louis Walbaum, Frédéric-Auguste Delius and Christian Heidsieck.

In 1838 after several disagreements, the three nephews decide to part ways. Henri Louis Walbaum (1813-1883) continues the business alone, joining forces with his brother-in-law Auguste Heidsieck (1796-1870). The company name therefore changes to "Walbaum Heidsieck & Co."

In 1860 Henri Louis Walbaum and Auguste Heidsieck establish the trademark “Monopole”. Following the death of Auguste Heidsieck, in 1870 the company Veuve Heidsieck et Co., heirs to Heidsieck & Co, is operating under the leadership of his widow for a few years. Her successor is Florens Walbaum, who becomes the First Chairman of the Syndicat du Commerce des Vins de Champagne from 1882 until his death in 1893.
I like it! Were these growing on the vines?
Bill Phillips: There were several bottles. I want a plant like this
I like how the geranium is wrapping around the bottle.
Bill Phillips: Almost cradling the bottle Jacquelyn
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 23 Aug 2016, 06:27
I don't know this sort of champagne (only the game), but it is a nice introitus to the house and garden.
Bill Phillips: It was founded in 1785 by Florens-Louis Heidsieck. Following the death of the founder in 1828, the successors were his relatives Henri-Louis Walbaum, Frédéric-Auguste Delius and Christian Heidsieck.

In 1838 after several disagreements, the three nephews decide to part ways. Henri Louis Walbaum (1813-1883) continues the business alone, joining forces with his brother-in-law Auguste Heidsieck (1796-1870). The company name therefore changes to "Walbaum Heidsieck & Co."

In 1860 Henri Louis Walbaum and Auguste Heidsieck establish the trademark “Monopole”. Following the death of Auguste Heidsieck, in 1870 the company Veuve Heidsieck et Co., heirs to Heidsieck & Co, is operating under the leadership of his widow for a few years. Her successor is Florens Walbaum, who becomes the First Chairman of the Syndicat du Commerce des Vins de Champagne from 1882 until his death in 1893. According to Chris
Beautiful bottle Bill! Is this a local Champagne?
Bill Phillips: It was founded in 1785 by Florens-Louis Heidsieck. Following the death of the founder in 1828, the successors were his relatives Henri-Louis Walbaum, Frédéric-Auguste Delius and Christian Heidsieck.

In 1838 after several disagreements, the three nephews decide to part ways. Henri Louis Walbaum (1813-1883) continues the business alone, joining forces with his brother-in-law Auguste Heidsieck (1796-1870). The company name therefore changes to "Walbaum Heidsieck & Co."

In 1860 Henri Louis Walbaum and Auguste Heidsieck establish the trademark “Monopole”. Following the death of Auguste Heidsieck, in 1870 the company Veuve Heidsieck et Co., heirs to Heidsieck & Co, is operating under the leadership of his widow for a few years. Her successor is Florens Walbaum, who becomes the First Chairman of the Syndicat du Commerce des Vins de Champagne from 1882 until his death in 1893. According to Chris!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 23 Aug 2016, 07:26
It was founded in 1785 by Florens-Louis Heidsieck. Following the death of the founder in 1828, the successors were his relatives Henri-Louis Walbaum, Frédéric-Auguste Delius and Christian Heidsieck.

In 1838 after several disagreements, the three nephews decide to part ways. Henri Louis Walbaum (1813-1883) continues the business alone, joining forces with his brother-in-law Auguste Heidsieck (1796-1870). The company name therefore changes to "Walbaum Heidsieck & Co."

In 1860 Henri Louis Walbaum and Auguste Heidsieck establish the trademark “Monopole”. Following the death of Auguste Heidsieck, in 1870 the company Veuve Heidsieck et Co., heirs to Heidsieck & Co, is operating under the leadership of his widow for a few years. Her successor is Florens Walbaum, who becomes the First Chairman of the Syndicat du Commerce des Vins de Champagne from 1882 until his death in 1893.





1901 advertisement for Heidsieck & Co. Monopole by Alfons Mucha.
The company name changes again to “Heidsieck & Co.” in 1882 . Following several other name changes, in 1889, The company becomes “Walbaum, Luling, Goulden & Co, successeurs d’Heidsieck & CO” in 1889 after several other name changes. It received an imperial warrant of appointment to the Russian court. In 1907 the company name becomes “Walbaum Goulden & Co, successeurs d’Heidsieck & Co, Maison fondée en 1785″. The company received an imperial and royal warrant of appointment for the Austro-Hungarian court.

In 1923 Édouard Mignot, founder of the grocery store chain “Les Comptoirs Français” acquires the company, which then becomes "Champagne Heidsieck & Co Monopole SA".

1956 After the Second World War, in 1956 the Champagne Academy in London is founded with "Heidsieck & Co Monopole" as one of the founding members.
Bill Phillips: Thank you for undertaking this research
Very good Brian
Bill Phillips: Thank you Richard
Sorry Bill, I meant Bill
Bill Phillips: Sorry I meant Chris
  • Lisl
  • Bath, England
  • 23 Aug 2016, 07:53
You never know your luck, Bill
Bill Phillips: Sadly I do Lisl grin
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 23 Aug 2016, 08:21
So some goodies do grow on trees, then, despite what others have told me.
Bill Phillips: I hoped they might sell these trees but could not find any in the shop
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 Aug 2016, 08:32
I wish we could get champagne to grow in our garden, did you take a cutting?
Bill Phillips: No all I got was some rhubarb they were giving away (donations were requested). Have to say it was very nice rhubarb
I am guessing the bottle is an insect trap.
Bill Phillips: There were several and I don't know what they were there for.
i wonder if there is stuff growing inside the bottle as well. nice shot, Bill. i also find the bent iron brackets and the wooden post rather appealing.
Bill Phillips: I think they were empty Ayush
this crop was certainly a delicious product from the garden Bill...
i have drank a liqueur with a full grown pear inside the bottle... my friend brought it back along with photos of bottles hanging over blossoms on trees in Portugal... this was about 50 years ago....petersmile
Bill Phillips: I have seen pears grown in bottles but have never actually bought one!
  • elleplate
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 Aug 2016, 21:10
Wow, i think i shall try to grow this on my allotment
Bill Phillips: If only .......smile
I shall have to see if our daughter grows this on her allotment.
Bill Phillips: If only.................
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 25 Aug 2016, 06:38
Did you take a cutting of this plant, Bill?
Bill Phillips: Drat!!!!

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