yellowbear

27 Apr 2016 118 views
 
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photoblog image Thing you see in Cookham

Thing you see in Cookham

The parish of Cookham, formed in 1894 from the ancient parish by the severance of that part of Maidenhead lying north of the London and Bath road, consists of an upland and lowland district. The latter, to the east, is in the Thames Valley between Hedsor and Maidenhead; the former, to the west, used to be known as Woodside and contains the hils of Cookham Dean, Rowburrow and Cocksburrow. The civil parish includes the whole of the ecclesiastical parishes of Cookham Dean, formed in 1846, and Cookham, besides parts of St. Luke's, Maidenhead (1867), and St. James's, Stubbings (1856). The modern hamlet called Cookham Rise is on Cocksburrow Hill. At the southern end of the parish the new hamlets of Furze Platt and Highway and the group of villas called Maidenhead Court border Maidenhead closely on the west and north. The area of the whole is 5,666 acres, of which 2,135 are arable, 1,776 permanent grass and 109 woods and plantations. In addition to the production of wheat, oats and barley a quantity of fruit is grown, and a number of the inhabitants find employment in the tile and brick works.

Thing you see in Cookham

The parish of Cookham, formed in 1894 from the ancient parish by the severance of that part of Maidenhead lying north of the London and Bath road, consists of an upland and lowland district. The latter, to the east, is in the Thames Valley between Hedsor and Maidenhead; the former, to the west, used to be known as Woodside and contains the hils of Cookham Dean, Rowburrow and Cocksburrow. The civil parish includes the whole of the ecclesiastical parishes of Cookham Dean, formed in 1846, and Cookham, besides parts of St. Luke's, Maidenhead (1867), and St. James's, Stubbings (1856). The modern hamlet called Cookham Rise is on Cocksburrow Hill. At the southern end of the parish the new hamlets of Furze Platt and Highway and the group of villas called Maidenhead Court border Maidenhead closely on the west and north. The area of the whole is 5,666 acres, of which 2,135 are arable, 1,776 permanent grass and 109 woods and plantations. In addition to the production of wheat, oats and barley a quantity of fruit is grown, and a number of the inhabitants find employment in the tile and brick works.

comments (15)

  • Ray
  • Possibly Greenland
  • 27 Apr 2016, 03:45
I like the dancing frogs, Bill.
Bill Phillips: But not in your garden
A nice and original ballet Bill!
Bill Phillips: I guess people must actually buy stuff like this but it is not my cup of tea
  • Chris
  • England
  • 27 Apr 2016, 06:30
And how many of these lovely things would you place in your own garden?

Neither would I..
Bill Phillips: Quite..........
I have a feeling one could spend a long time there photographing everything, Bill. How fun!
Bill Phillips: True Ginnie, but actually I only took this one picture as I recall
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 27 Apr 2016, 06:50
.....and never regret anything that made you smile...... smile so true smile smile smile
Don't you just love this?? LOVE the signs too...except the most right one... you can say it differently.
Bill Phillips: Sometimes one has to be blunt, Please get off my land would be nicer
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 27 Apr 2016, 07:22
Funny people - Ginnie might be right!
Bill Phillips: She often is Philine. I actually only took this one picture here though
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 27 Apr 2016, 07:55
I bet these sell like hot frogs, Bill
Bill Phillips: Groan...........................grin
So this what you and Tiffo were ogling on the other side of the road Bill. When you think about the two words - get and off, they don't really work that sensibly together.
Bill Phillips: They can...."Get off the railway line a train is coming" would work quite sensibly
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 27 Apr 2016, 08:40
I especially like the sign on the left about life being short and also the friendly welcome on the ight - "get off my land"; my sort of signs. As for the figres, are they caricatures of the Three Stooges?
Bill Phillips: The life is short sign is good...especially the first line

The figures could be but which is which I will leave to you
What a bunch of kitch! I hope you bought the frogs for Ray.
Bill Phillips: I wouldn't insult him with them Mary
  • Martine
  • United States
  • 27 Apr 2016, 11:18
Surprenants petits personnages.
Bill Phillips: Ils sont inhabituelles Martine!
We've got some strange things in our garden but I don't think we'd want one of these!
Bill Phillips: Dreadful aren't they?
  • Pauline
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Apr 2016, 17:51
They're creepy, Bill.
Bill Phillips: They don't do much for me Pauline. I certainly wouldn't want them prancing about in my garden
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 27 Apr 2016, 17:58
The tile and bricks works? Okay, there are bricks in the wall, but the rest ...? Are they the cooks of Cookham? No wonder they lost Maidenhead smile
Bill Phillips: The brickworks is, I imagine long gone. In past times many areas had their brick works and all the buildings were thus built using the same brick in the same colour. Now all sorts of bricks of differing colours and quality adorn the modern developments. These tend to be characterless dwellings in anonymous estates. It is called progress
An odd lot of elves!
Bill Phillips: Decidedly Tom

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