yellowbear

01 Feb 2016 119 views
 
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photoblog image Evesham 1 of 5

Evesham 1 of 5

The name of Evesham comes from the Old English home and Eof. It was officially noted down in 709 as Eveshomme and was first recorded as Evesham in 1086. The word home or ham was typically used to denote land that was prone to flooding in a bend or by the side of a river in Worcestershire.

In 701, Evesham Abbey was founded and grew to become one of the largest Abbeys in England. Following the Norman Conquest, the Abbey was built upon further after the conclusion of the Norman Conquest. This led to the further growth of Evesham as well as considerable income from pilgrimages to the Abbey. Evesham Abbey was later sold and dismantled by Henry VIII as part of the dissolution of the monasteries. Little is left remaining of the Abbey today.

Evesham developed as an important market town after being granted a market by King Edward in 1055.
Evesham is the site of an important historical battle in August 1265. The battle was part of the Second Barons’ War where Prince Edward was victorious over de Montfort and was a serious setback for the rebellion. It was not a decisive victory however with the rebellion continuing until 1267.

Evesham 1 of 5

The name of Evesham comes from the Old English home and Eof. It was officially noted down in 709 as Eveshomme and was first recorded as Evesham in 1086. The word home or ham was typically used to denote land that was prone to flooding in a bend or by the side of a river in Worcestershire.

In 701, Evesham Abbey was founded and grew to become one of the largest Abbeys in England. Following the Norman Conquest, the Abbey was built upon further after the conclusion of the Norman Conquest. This led to the further growth of Evesham as well as considerable income from pilgrimages to the Abbey. Evesham Abbey was later sold and dismantled by Henry VIII as part of the dissolution of the monasteries. Little is left remaining of the Abbey today.

Evesham developed as an important market town after being granted a market by King Edward in 1055.
Evesham is the site of an important historical battle in August 1265. The battle was part of the Second Barons’ War where Prince Edward was victorious over de Montfort and was a serious setback for the rebellion. It was not a decisive victory however with the rebellion continuing until 1267.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • United States
  • 1 Feb 2016, 00:41
Interesting history lesson, Bill...your depiction of Evesham bollards is also enlightening.
Bill Phillips: A fine set of bollards are they not?
Such history! Surely people weren't even alive then!!! (A little Eddie Izzard humor for you!)
Bill Phillips: Hhaha I love Eddie Izard
Thank you for this history lesson Bill. Fine capture!
Bill Phillips: You are welcome smile
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 1 Feb 2016, 06:40
I used to go there as a young child, and have never been back, so this is a timely reminder to investigate the place again
Bill Phillips: It still has some very nice bits
  • Chris
  • England
  • 1 Feb 2016, 06:46
Very nice too, Evesham is a charming place from what I remember
Bill Phillips: It is very fine in parts
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 1 Feb 2016, 06:52
What happened after 1267 , Billiam?
Bill Phillips: 1268
The scene you've chosen, Bill, with it's POV, invites me in.
Bill Phillips: Perhaps one day I will take you there Ginnie
Did you know all this Bill, or lift it from Evesham.co.uk? Anyway I'm impressed, there is so much information that my he'd is in a spin. I never knew half of it or even less. The photosnap is very nice.
Bill Phillips: I knew it all he said lying through his teeth
The old buildings looked wonderful.
Bill Phillips: They are rather fine aren't they?
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 1 Feb 2016, 11:08
What a beautiful light here. And what a great POV.
Bill Phillips: We picked a rare nice day!
Some nice buildings there and a fine red postbox as well. I seem to think we went there many years ago but can't recall anything about the place.
Bill Phillips: There are a couple of rather fine churches that you will get to see later Brian
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 1 Feb 2016, 13:11
A ham or home is the flooded side of a river bend. I always thought that would be 'Droitwich' in English.
Bill Phillips: We only have floods now and then Louis
Taken from a good view point, it all looks very clean and tidy.
Bill Phillips: It does and free of people too!
Some fine buildings, Bill.
Bill Phillips: There are some very nice buildings in the town tom

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