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09 Sep 2015 65 views
 
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photoblog image Aberaeron 2

Aberaeron 2

In 1800, there was no significant coastal settlement.The present town was planned and developed from 1805 by the Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne. The harbour he built operated as a port and supported ashipbuilding industry in the 19th century. A group of workmen's houses and a school were built on the harbour's north side, but these were reclaimed by the sea. Steam ships continued to visit the harbour until the 1920s but, in later years, it evolved into a small half-tide harbour for recreational craft. The estuary is also crossed by a wooden pedestrian bridge.

Crafts were an important part of village life. Information recorded in trade directories shows that in 1830, although it was not yet fully developed as a port, there were in Aberaeron one woollen manufacturer, one bootmaker, one baker, one corn miller, one blacksmith, one blacksmith and shovel maker, two shipwrights, one carpenter and one hat maker.

In the late 1890s, a hand-powered cable car, the 'Aeron Express', was built to ferry workers across the harbour when the bridge was demolished by floods. The structure was recreated in 1988 as a tourist attraction that ran until the end of summer 1994, when it was closed under health and safety regulations.

The architecture of Aberaeron is unusual in this part of rural Wales, being constructed around a principal square of elegant Regency style buildings grouped around the harbour. This was the work of Edward Haycock, an architect from Shrewsbury. Some of the architecture was of sufficient interest to feature on British postage stamps.

Aberaeron 2

In 1800, there was no significant coastal settlement.The present town was planned and developed from 1805 by the Rev. Alban Thomas Jones Gwynne. The harbour he built operated as a port and supported ashipbuilding industry in the 19th century. A group of workmen's houses and a school were built on the harbour's north side, but these were reclaimed by the sea. Steam ships continued to visit the harbour until the 1920s but, in later years, it evolved into a small half-tide harbour for recreational craft. The estuary is also crossed by a wooden pedestrian bridge.

Crafts were an important part of village life. Information recorded in trade directories shows that in 1830, although it was not yet fully developed as a port, there were in Aberaeron one woollen manufacturer, one bootmaker, one baker, one corn miller, one blacksmith, one blacksmith and shovel maker, two shipwrights, one carpenter and one hat maker.

In the late 1890s, a hand-powered cable car, the 'Aeron Express', was built to ferry workers across the harbour when the bridge was demolished by floods. The structure was recreated in 1988 as a tourist attraction that ran until the end of summer 1994, when it was closed under health and safety regulations.

The architecture of Aberaeron is unusual in this part of rural Wales, being constructed around a principal square of elegant Regency style buildings grouped around the harbour. This was the work of Edward Haycock, an architect from Shrewsbury. Some of the architecture was of sufficient interest to feature on British postage stamps.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Thailanddy plu
  • 9 Sep 2015, 03:01
Lovely sheen on the mud, Bill.
Bill Phillips: We saw a bloke walking across it with his dawg. We saw the dawg later and didn't encourage it to come and see us as it was very muddy
I quite like the atmosphere here Bill!
Bill Phillips: It is a charming place Richard
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Sep 2015, 06:23
The information becomes more detailed - many, many boats, a dramatic sky! Blue is a typically English colour, a royal colour!
Bill Phillips: I have always liked blue Philine even though I am not even a little bit royal
  • Chris
  • England
  • 9 Sep 2015, 06:40
It looks absolutely charming but the weather obviously helps
Bill Phillips: True. It was the one nice day we had so Aberaeron got photographed a lot
I especially like all the blue highlights on the boats...let alone the sky.
Bill Phillips: Plenty of blue for fans of blue.
  • Lisl
  • Batheaston
  • 9 Sep 2015, 08:55
I think the colours are very nice, too, Bill
Bill Phillips: Then I am a happy camper Lisl
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 9 Sep 2015, 11:44
Looks like an agreeable little port town, very much enhanced by your endeavours.
Bill Phillips: It is very pleasant with o many of the buildings painted in a cheerful range of colours and all well kept
Looks like a very charming place. What a sky!
Bill Phillips: It is delightful Mary
Funny to think that this started out as a good photograph. Keep up the twiddling Bill.
Bill Phillips: Straight from the camera
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Sep 2015, 15:05
Lovely picture Bill
Bill Phillips: Thank you Anne
Nice treatment, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Tom 5 image picture
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 9 Sep 2015, 16:25
This is a beautiful scene. I always love the boats in the mud... what a great moody sky too.
Bill Phillips: Ange always likes harbours and this whole town is rather appealing
Nice shot, Bill, a busy little harbour.
Bill Phillips: The whole area around Cardigan Bay is delightful Frank
Harbours with the tide out are always good places for images.
Bill Phillips: I took loads Brian!

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