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06 May 2015 150 views
 
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photoblog image Hanging /washing basket

Hanging /washing basket

The modern English word sock is derived from the Old English word socc, meaning "light slipper". This comes from the Latin soccus, a term to describe a "light, low-heeled shoe" worn by Roman comic actors,[2] and deriving from the Ancient Greek word sykchos.[3]

History

 
The earliest known surviving pair of socks, created by naalbinding. Dating from 300-500AD these were excavated from Oxyrhynchus on the Nile in Egypt. The split toes were designed for use with sandals. On display in the Victoria and Albert museum, reference 2085&A-1900.
 
12th-century cotton sock, found inEgypt. The knitter of this sock started work at the toe and then worked up towards the leg. The heel was made last and then attached to loops formed while knitting the leg. This practice allowed the heel to be easily replaced when it wore out.

Socks have evolved over the centuries from the earliest models, which were made from animal skins gathered up and tied around the ankles. In the 8th century BC, the Ancient Greekswore socks from matted animal hair for warmth. The Romans also wrapped their feet with leather or woven fabrics. By the 5th century AD, socks called "puttees" were worn by holy people in Europe to symbolise purity. By 1000 AD, socks became a symbol of wealth among the nobility. From the 16th century onwards, an ornamental design on the ankle or side of a sock has been called a clock.[4][5][6]

The invention of a knitting machine in 1589 meant that socks could be knitted six times faster than by hand. Nonetheless, knitting machines and hand knitters worked side by side until 1800.[7]

The next revolution in sock production was the introduction of nylon in 1938. Until then socks were commonly made from silk, cotton and wool. Nylon was the start of blending two or more yarns in the production of socks, a process that still continues.

 

According to Wiki 

Hanging /washing basket

The modern English word sock is derived from the Old English word socc, meaning "light slipper". This comes from the Latin soccus, a term to describe a "light, low-heeled shoe" worn by Roman comic actors,[2] and deriving from the Ancient Greek word sykchos.[3]

History

 
The earliest known surviving pair of socks, created by naalbinding. Dating from 300-500AD these were excavated from Oxyrhynchus on the Nile in Egypt. The split toes were designed for use with sandals. On display in the Victoria and Albert museum, reference 2085&A-1900.
 
12th-century cotton sock, found inEgypt. The knitter of this sock started work at the toe and then worked up towards the leg. The heel was made last and then attached to loops formed while knitting the leg. This practice allowed the heel to be easily replaced when it wore out.

Socks have evolved over the centuries from the earliest models, which were made from animal skins gathered up and tied around the ankles. In the 8th century BC, the Ancient Greekswore socks from matted animal hair for warmth. The Romans also wrapped their feet with leather or woven fabrics. By the 5th century AD, socks called "puttees" were worn by holy people in Europe to symbolise purity. By 1000 AD, socks became a symbol of wealth among the nobility. From the 16th century onwards, an ornamental design on the ankle or side of a sock has been called a clock.[4][5][6]

The invention of a knitting machine in 1589 meant that socks could be knitted six times faster than by hand. Nonetheless, knitting machines and hand knitters worked side by side until 1800.[7]

The next revolution in sock production was the introduction of nylon in 1938. Until then socks were commonly made from silk, cotton and wool. Nylon was the start of blending two or more yarns in the production of socks, a process that still continues.

 

According to Wiki 

comments (24)

Thanks, I learned something... smile
Bill Phillips: If you learn something new every day then you will be very clever when you grow up Larry
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 6 May 2015, 04:55
So 'simple' as a sock... that is a lot of information. Wonder why they needed socks in Egypt, not the coldest country in the world..
Love the top picture, I assume underneath that basket were a lot of wellies to choose from??
Bill Phillips: I couldn't see but I prefer plants in a hanging basket normally Lady P grin
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 6 May 2015, 06:15
A darned good posting and blurb, Billiam. We have to 'sock it' to you.
Bill Phillips: Oh you are a wag comrade
  • Chris
  • England
  • 6 May 2015, 06:45
I am obliged to you for the image of the carefully draped hosepipe. The sock history is interesting and at the same time barmy.
Bill Phillips: I like the idea of socks as a symbol of wealth.
Well sock it to me Bill This is most interesting, the humble sock is not given the due respect it deserves considering the vital job it performs. Out of sight out of mind comes to mind.
Bill Phillips: The expression out of sight out of mind is usually used in connection with Mick Shaw .......imagine if he had a brother called Richard?
Oh and, pictures alright.
Bill Phillips: They were part of the deal
Sock it to me, indeed (borrowing from Chad). The things we learn here on SC never cease to amaze me! smile
Bill Phillips: We are all bulging with useless information Ginnie.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 May 2015, 07:14
Oh, this is very educative - the German word is "Socke", also used to describe a person "Du alte Socke!"
Bill Phillips: I will use that expression when I see some of my friends Philine
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 May 2015, 07:15
I like the photo!
Bill Phillips: Thank you smile
Another interesting bit of history Bill! I learnt something new.
Bill Phillips: So did I Richard. I never knew the sock had such a history
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 May 2015, 08:24
The socks are essential for the human beans - as some phrases might show:
German phrases:
jemanden von den Socken hauen
sich auf die Socken (legs) machen
von den Socken sein
quite more phrases in English:
http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/sock
Bill Phillips: Yes there are quite a few
Put a sock in it (be quiet)
Pull your socks up (work harder )
and there must be many more
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 May 2015, 08:49
Clearly a clever solution for smelly socks - even a handy hosepipe should they get too feisty and need cooling down!
Bill Phillips: These are clearly extreme socks Mike
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 May 2015, 08:50
Now this is the sort of hanging basket that even I could manage. Complete with a washing facility, too. I wonder if my socks will be chosen for a future display at the V & A Museum?
Bill Phillips: I don't see why not. Our Viners cutlery is
  • Pauline
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 May 2015, 09:21
Very interesting, Bill. Love the photo. DO you think the phrase "well heeled" comes from being able to replace the heels?
Bill Phillips: You could well be right Pauline
I am counting the days till all the socks are put away till next winter. Good idea to keep the soccer (football) socks outdoors in the fresh air.
Bill Phillips: There are few things less desirable than sweaty socks
hahaha nice one Bill... gosh.
Thanks for sharing this
Bill Phillips: It made me smile Ronky
A lot of work went into the Egyptian one creating those patterns by the look of it Bill. Fascinating stuff with the modern day swingers along with dirty trainers and hosepipe to bring us up to date
Bill Phillips: Those Egyptians knew a thing or two Janet
Up north we put flowers in our hanging baskets .Just goes to show what a down at heel Droitwich is.
Bill Phillips: This is Worcester and Cannabis doesn't count as a flower
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 6 May 2015, 15:06
So at your place, you just hose down the washing and then leave it hanging to dry. Very nifty.
Bill Phillips: Keep it simple has always been my motto Louis
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 May 2015, 15:33
What an educational post Bill, I remember my mum having a wooden mushroom shaped contraption to help with darning socks
Bill Phillips: There was a name for them but I can't remember what it is
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 May 2015, 17:11
I met once an English gentleman who wore socks in the colours of the Union Jack at the football match England- Germany on the tv. N. Farage likes to wear such socks, too.
Bill Phillips: The former was probably just a harmless enthusiastic football supporter. The latter represents an odious part of the political spectrum
One is somehow comforted to know the history smile
Bill Phillips: If an ancient Egyptian returned he would feel at home in the sock shop
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 6 May 2015, 23:05
Also the root of "soccer"...

Love the garden hose, for washing particularly pungent pairs!
Bill Phillips: An essential tool Ray
  • Bonnie
  • United States
  • 8 May 2015, 03:27
Who knew?! And what a great collection!

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