yellowbear

01 Mar 2015 89 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image St Michaels Cropthorne

St Michaels Cropthorne

The church of ST. MICHAEL consists of a chancel about 34 ft. by 14½ft., nave 47 ft. by the same width, north and south aisles 9½ ft. and 9 ft. wide respectively, south porch, and a western tower 11 ft. square. These measurements are all internal.

The earliest portion of the present building was begun about the year 1100, and appears to have been a rebuilding of an earlier structure, beginning with the north arcade and aisle, followed soon afterwards by those on the south side. About 1170 the chancel arch was inserted, and a few years later the tower added, the chancel being rebuilt and widened about 1200. The church stood thus, with chancel, nave with narrow aisles, and west tower, till the middle of the 14th century, when the chancel was again rebuilt and the nave aisles widened.

Late in the 15th century the church seems to have been much altered, and it is not improbable, from the character of the bases, that the north arcade was then rebuilt with the old stones before the clearstory was added. The tower also was raised to its present height, with the intention of adding a spire, but the last work was never carried out. The south porch seems to be the work of a later date, probably with older materials, and in the 18th century the north range of clearstory windows was renewed in the 'churchwarden' style of the time. In 1894 the chancel was rebuilt with the old materials, and the church also underwent restorations in 1900 and 1903, and a further one has lately been completed.

The three-light east window has modern tracery, but the jambs belong to the 14th century. On either side are plain brackets in the east wall, and in the north-east corner is a square plastered recess with a shelf.

In the north wall is a small lancet window dating from about the year 1200, and on the south side are three square-headed windows, each of two lights; the heads of the two eastern are modern, while the third is of later date than the chancel. Under the easternmost window is a 13th-century piscina in the form of a round moulded capital.

 

The chancel arch has 12th-century jambs, of two orders, the inner with an engaged shaft on the west angle. The outer order has been cut away on the west face. The engaged shafts have scalloped capitals, but the arch, of two chamfered orders, is of much later date and is very unevenly built, and above it the wall is set back on the west face.

The north arcade of the nave consists of four bays with circular piers and semicircular arches of two square orders. The western respond, and the second pier from it, have meagre 12th-century moulded capitals, but the others are apparently later copies. The south arcade is also of four bays and has half-round arches of two orders, and circular piers with moulded capitals and bases differing somewhat from those opposite. The tower arch has jambs and a pointed arch of two chamfered orders with a square and chamfered abacus carved with tooth ornament.

In the clearstory on the north side are three large plain windows with square panes and arched heads, of 18th-century design. On the south side the three windows, of late 15th-century date, are each of two lights with blank spandrels within a square internal head and an external elliptical head. The square-headed east window of the north aisle is of three lights, and the two windows in the north wall are of two lights under square heads, differing slightly in design. The 14th-century north doorway has a two-centred chamfered arch, considerably restored.

The east window of the south aisle differs but slightly from that of the north, and the three side windows are each of two ogee-headed lights. The 14th-century south doorway has a two-centred arch of one chamfered order. The remains of an old piscina basin still exist in the south-east corner of the south aisle, with an arch over, of much later date. In the east wall is a square recess with rebated jambs. A large groove in the north wall of the aisle, next to the east wall, seems to suggest that the wall has been reconstructed east of its original position.

St Michaels Cropthorne

The church of ST. MICHAEL consists of a chancel about 34 ft. by 14½ft., nave 47 ft. by the same width, north and south aisles 9½ ft. and 9 ft. wide respectively, south porch, and a western tower 11 ft. square. These measurements are all internal.

The earliest portion of the present building was begun about the year 1100, and appears to have been a rebuilding of an earlier structure, beginning with the north arcade and aisle, followed soon afterwards by those on the south side. About 1170 the chancel arch was inserted, and a few years later the tower added, the chancel being rebuilt and widened about 1200. The church stood thus, with chancel, nave with narrow aisles, and west tower, till the middle of the 14th century, when the chancel was again rebuilt and the nave aisles widened.

Late in the 15th century the church seems to have been much altered, and it is not improbable, from the character of the bases, that the north arcade was then rebuilt with the old stones before the clearstory was added. The tower also was raised to its present height, with the intention of adding a spire, but the last work was never carried out. The south porch seems to be the work of a later date, probably with older materials, and in the 18th century the north range of clearstory windows was renewed in the 'churchwarden' style of the time. In 1894 the chancel was rebuilt with the old materials, and the church also underwent restorations in 1900 and 1903, and a further one has lately been completed.

The three-light east window has modern tracery, but the jambs belong to the 14th century. On either side are plain brackets in the east wall, and in the north-east corner is a square plastered recess with a shelf.

In the north wall is a small lancet window dating from about the year 1200, and on the south side are three square-headed windows, each of two lights; the heads of the two eastern are modern, while the third is of later date than the chancel. Under the easternmost window is a 13th-century piscina in the form of a round moulded capital.

 

The chancel arch has 12th-century jambs, of two orders, the inner with an engaged shaft on the west angle. The outer order has been cut away on the west face. The engaged shafts have scalloped capitals, but the arch, of two chamfered orders, is of much later date and is very unevenly built, and above it the wall is set back on the west face.

The north arcade of the nave consists of four bays with circular piers and semicircular arches of two square orders. The western respond, and the second pier from it, have meagre 12th-century moulded capitals, but the others are apparently later copies. The south arcade is also of four bays and has half-round arches of two orders, and circular piers with moulded capitals and bases differing somewhat from those opposite. The tower arch has jambs and a pointed arch of two chamfered orders with a square and chamfered abacus carved with tooth ornament.

In the clearstory on the north side are three large plain windows with square panes and arched heads, of 18th-century design. On the south side the three windows, of late 15th-century date, are each of two lights with blank spandrels within a square internal head and an external elliptical head. The square-headed east window of the north aisle is of three lights, and the two windows in the north wall are of two lights under square heads, differing slightly in design. The 14th-century north doorway has a two-centred chamfered arch, considerably restored.

The east window of the south aisle differs but slightly from that of the north, and the three side windows are each of two ogee-headed lights. The 14th-century south doorway has a two-centred arch of one chamfered order. The remains of an old piscina basin still exist in the south-east corner of the south aisle, with an arch over, of much later date. In the east wall is a square recess with rebated jambs. A large groove in the north wall of the aisle, next to the east wall, seems to suggest that the wall has been reconstructed east of its original position.

comments (13)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 1 Mar 2015, 00:58
Lovely wooden furniture here, Bill...Tiffo could get a few ideas for his replacement bench...
Bill Phillips: You sometimes find old pews for sale Ray so anything is possible
Very impressive isn't it!
Bill Phillips: There are a number of nice churches around our way E. Cropthorne is a good example
  • Chris
  • England
  • 1 Mar 2015, 07:24
Very agreeable, but HDR would improve it
Bill Phillips: Taken from a single raw image and then given minimal adjustment. This is a picture from 2011
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 1 Mar 2015, 07:39
A beautiful, old church, still working as I see - later I'll read your information, for I want to know more about the memorial on the left side.
Bill Phillips: It is indeed and is a grade 1 listed building. I have sent you a picture of the tomb by email
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 1 Mar 2015, 08:14
So much history. I like the pews very much. So much nicer than chairs.
Bill Phillips: Yet in most churches they are a Victorian addition
Quite a beautiful church Bill. I really like the skylight!
Bill Phillips: It is indeed Richard
wow... this is beautiful Bill.. thanks for sharing
Bill Phillips: We have some lovely churches in Worcestershire Ronky
the simplicity of the walls contrast the intricacy of the carvings on the pews
Bill Phillips: It does indeed Ayush.
It's a simple but really attractive church isn't it. The pews are fine aren't they, I still don't understand how the fellowship at some churches take wonderful things like these away and replace them with horrible modern plastic chairs!!
Bill Phillips: The problem with pews(some say) is that they restrict what the church can do with the building. Most are Victorian and (Some say) should be removed
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 1 Mar 2015, 17:00
An interesting looking place, that aisle looks very long
Bill Phillips: It is quite long but perhaps the wide angle also exaggerates it!
A fine old church - good to see the pews still there!
Bill Phillips: They are rather fine examples Tom
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 1 Mar 2015, 19:30
The strong bold and simple arches do it for me, Billiam
Bill Phillips: I agree comrade
  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 1 Mar 2015, 22:30
I like the detail in the wooden panelling.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera unknown
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed unknown
aperture f/0.0
sensitivity unknown
focal length 0.0mm
Daffodil in my gardenDaffodil in my g...
Toys 1 of 3Toys 1 of 3
3 Megapixels No 73 Megapixels No 7

Warning