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27 Oct 2014 114 views
 
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photoblog image Deck chairs 1

Deck chairs 1

https://www.flickr.com/photos/figgis-minor/15370910016/

 

In Northern Europe, the remains of folding chairs have been found dating back to the Bronze Age. Foldable chairs were also used in Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. During the Middle Ages, the folding chair was widely used as aliturgical furniture piece. In the United States, an early patent for a folding chair was by John Cham in 1855.Folding wooden chairs with woven or cane seats and backs, of the type now known in the UK as "steamer chairs", began to be used on ocean liner decks from about the 1860s, and were known at the time as "deck chairs". It is unclear whether they were first made in the US or Britain. In England, John Thomas Moore (1864-1929) took out a patent for adjustable and portable folding chairs in 1886, and started manufacturing them in Macclesfield Moore made two types: the Waverley, described as "the best ship or lawn tennis chair", and the Hygienic, which was a rocking chair "valuable for those with sluggish and constipated bowels".

Early versions of the deck chair were made of two rectangular wooden frames hinged together, with a third rectangle to maintain it upright. A rectangular piece of canvas, of the type used in hammocks, was attached to two of the wooden rectangles to provide a seat and support. The use of a single broad strip of canvas, originally olive green in colour but later usually of brightly coloured stripes, has been credited to a British inventor named Atkins in the late 19th century, although advertisements of 1882 for a similar design refer to it as "The Yankee Hammock Chair", implying an American origin. Other sources refer to it as the "Brighton beach chair" or "chaise transatlantique" ("chaise transat"). The term 'deck' chair was used in the novels of E. Nesbit in the 1880s, and passengers on P & O liners in the 1890s were encouraged to take their own on board.The classic deckchair can only be locked in one position. Later, the strips of wood going toward the back were lengthened and equipped with supports so that there were several possible sitting positions. A removable footrest can also add to the comfort of the user.

Folding deckchairs became widely popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. During the golden age of ocean liner travel, the deckchairs upon ships' decks were sometimes reserved for particular passengers for whom crew would attach a paperboard name tag to the wicker seat-back. Such a tag is visible on an empty deckchair near the center in a famous 1912 photo showing survivors of the RMS Titanic disaster after rescue while they rest on the deck of RMS Carpathia.[6][7] The same system was in use aboard Carpathia two years later; a reservation tag is visible on the empty deckchair in the lower right of a 1914 photo. The deckchairs shown on some of those photographs are of the more solid "steamer chair" type, rather than the portable canvas-seated chairs. The Titanic carried 600 such wooden chairs; six were known to survive, of which one was sold in 2001 for £35,000,and another was put up for sale in 2012 with an expected price of at least £62,000.

The hiring out of deckchairs, on an hourly or daily basis, became established in British seaside resorts, often for use on piers and promenades, in the early 20th century. They were also often used in large public parks such as Hyde Park, and for spectators at informal sporting events such as local cricket matches. With the widespread availability of lighter and even more portable forms of seating later in the century, the use of deckchairs declined.[5] In one of the largest English resorts, Blackpool, 68,000 deckchairs were rented out in 2003, at £1.50 a day, but tourism officers suggested that they should be phased out, except on the piers themselves, because they were a reminder of the era of "cloth caps", and had "had their time in the 50s and 60s".

 

Good old Wikipedia!

Deck chairs 1

https://www.flickr.com/photos/figgis-minor/15370910016/

 

In Northern Europe, the remains of folding chairs have been found dating back to the Bronze Age. Foldable chairs were also used in Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. During the Middle Ages, the folding chair was widely used as aliturgical furniture piece. In the United States, an early patent for a folding chair was by John Cham in 1855.Folding wooden chairs with woven or cane seats and backs, of the type now known in the UK as "steamer chairs", began to be used on ocean liner decks from about the 1860s, and were known at the time as "deck chairs". It is unclear whether they were first made in the US or Britain. In England, John Thomas Moore (1864-1929) took out a patent for adjustable and portable folding chairs in 1886, and started manufacturing them in Macclesfield Moore made two types: the Waverley, described as "the best ship or lawn tennis chair", and the Hygienic, which was a rocking chair "valuable for those with sluggish and constipated bowels".

Early versions of the deck chair were made of two rectangular wooden frames hinged together, with a third rectangle to maintain it upright. A rectangular piece of canvas, of the type used in hammocks, was attached to two of the wooden rectangles to provide a seat and support. The use of a single broad strip of canvas, originally olive green in colour but later usually of brightly coloured stripes, has been credited to a British inventor named Atkins in the late 19th century, although advertisements of 1882 for a similar design refer to it as "The Yankee Hammock Chair", implying an American origin. Other sources refer to it as the "Brighton beach chair" or "chaise transatlantique" ("chaise transat"). The term 'deck' chair was used in the novels of E. Nesbit in the 1880s, and passengers on P & O liners in the 1890s were encouraged to take their own on board.The classic deckchair can only be locked in one position. Later, the strips of wood going toward the back were lengthened and equipped with supports so that there were several possible sitting positions. A removable footrest can also add to the comfort of the user.

Folding deckchairs became widely popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. During the golden age of ocean liner travel, the deckchairs upon ships' decks were sometimes reserved for particular passengers for whom crew would attach a paperboard name tag to the wicker seat-back. Such a tag is visible on an empty deckchair near the center in a famous 1912 photo showing survivors of the RMS Titanic disaster after rescue while they rest on the deck of RMS Carpathia.[6][7] The same system was in use aboard Carpathia two years later; a reservation tag is visible on the empty deckchair in the lower right of a 1914 photo. The deckchairs shown on some of those photographs are of the more solid "steamer chair" type, rather than the portable canvas-seated chairs. The Titanic carried 600 such wooden chairs; six were known to survive, of which one was sold in 2001 for £35,000,and another was put up for sale in 2012 with an expected price of at least £62,000.

The hiring out of deckchairs, on an hourly or daily basis, became established in British seaside resorts, often for use on piers and promenades, in the early 20th century. They were also often used in large public parks such as Hyde Park, and for spectators at informal sporting events such as local cricket matches. With the widespread availability of lighter and even more portable forms of seating later in the century, the use of deckchairs declined.[5] In one of the largest English resorts, Blackpool, 68,000 deckchairs were rented out in 2003, at £1.50 a day, but tourism officers suggested that they should be phased out, except on the piers themselves, because they were a reminder of the era of "cloth caps", and had "had their time in the 50s and 60s".

 

Good old Wikipedia!

comments (20)

Phew!...Now I need a sit down. Is there a chair handy?
Bill Phillips: 50p an hour mate
Wow! Who knew???!!! I like the comp on this Bill!
Bill Phillips: It is amazing that something so uncomfortable has endured so long E
  • ....peter:)
  • Moonbeam, Ontario, Canada
  • 27 Oct 2014, 04:49
I like the chairs all lined up on the rack Bill... but they don't take away the wonderful seascape and cliffs around them....petersmile
Bill Phillips: Thank you Peter. This is the Dorset town of Swanage
  • Chris
  • England
  • 27 Oct 2014, 06:13
This looks like Swonnidge to me. Deckchairs - you can keem 'em!
Bill Phillips: It is the same! Keem?
  • gutteridge
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 27 Oct 2014, 06:23
But I doubt if the Bronze Age Deck chair hire company had disclaimers to protect themselves, as we noted in Lynton Bill.
Bill Phillips: An interesting point Ridge. They probably did in this country but the foreign Johnnies were more cavalier
So, cloth caps have had their time! Like so many of us these days, I think, Bill?? grin
Bill Phillips: I've got a flat cap. Very warm in the winter grin
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 27 Oct 2014, 07:36
Such pristine deckchairs - were they really white and impractical, or did you have a twiddle, Bill?
Bill Phillips: They were white Lisl.
I'll read the text later
Bill Phillips: It is quite interesting JC
Wow, I need one of these chairs to sit and read Wikipedia's words Bill...Great twiddling!
Bill Phillips: Haha Richard.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 27 Oct 2014, 08:08
Thank goodness I am sitting down in a free chair right now.......at the garage with free wifi......phew live can be exhausting.
Bill Phillips: Everything's free in Hollandshire grin
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Oct 2014, 08:48
WHAT? Being phased out in Blackpool? Outrageous. Mind you, I've not been there since the 1970s and will probably never go go again, especially as they only use their older trams now on rare occasions. The deck chair are icons of the English seaside.
Bill Phillips: The seaside without deck chairs is unthinkable
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 27 Oct 2014, 08:49
Heh heh very good - I like the cribbed essay too. 1500 words on deck chairs by Friday? Sorted!

B&W would work too with your treatment.
Bill Phillips: I might just try it in b&w Mike
Some people have problems assembling them I seem to remember
Bill Phillips: They are dangerous Janet grin
I like the dark beach and the stark white chairs. Great info.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Mary I never realised they had such a history!
There's something so iconic about these deck chairs at the beach, Bill.
Lovely shot.
Bill Phillips: I can't-imagine the seaside without stacks of deckchairs Pauline
Wow, so much information.....but interesting. Shame about Blackpool, I rather like them. Nice composition, Bill smile
Bill Phillips: It seems weird for somewhere like Blackpool to not have deckchairs
Maureen's brother rang up last night and said he'd had a boring day at Swanage all day, (not), lucky bloke, he lives about 150 miles nearer than we do!
Bill Phillips: You don't go to Swanage to get excited Brian grin
  • Richard Trim
  • I\\\'m in sussex for a few days
  • 27 Oct 2014, 18:22
The deckchair theme was done some time ago ... keep up
Bill Phillips: So have candids, people eating junk food, seascapes, landscapes, sunrises, sunsets, flowers, trees, benches, food, insects, birds. cats and other furry animals, architecture including churches, motor vehicles..etc etc etc. So your point is? gringringrin
Terrific shot, Bill - and, as you say, good old Wikipedia!
Bill Phillips: Thanks Tom. The worry is we all tend to assume wikipedia is actually correct!
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 28 Oct 2014, 06:27
I suppose they stack well...

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