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02 Sep 2014 99 views
 
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photoblog image Severn Valley railway one of a lot

Severn Valley railway one of a lot

This locomotive is number 34053 Sir Keith Park 

 

Air Chief Marshal Sir Keith Rodney Park GCB, KBE, MC & Bar, DFC (15 June 1892 – 6 February 1975) was a New Zealand soldier, First World War flying ace and Second World War Royal Air Force commander. He was in operational command during two of the most significant air battles in the European theatre in the Second World War, helping to win the Battle of Britain and the Battle of Malta. In Germany, he was known as "the Defender of London"

 

Oliver Bulleid was born in 1882 at Invercargill in New Zealand, to British immigrants. His return to Britain in 1889 after the death of his father. He joined the Great Northern's Doncaster Works as an apprentice at age 18. On finishing his apprenticeship in 1906, Bulleid became an assistant to the locomotive superintendent and then works manager.

In 1908, he moved to the Westinghouse Works near Paris as Chief Draughtsman. He quickly became an engineer for the British displays at the Brussels and Turin trade fairs, before deciding to return to British railway work and became Nigel Gresley's personal assistant at the GNR in 1911.

With the exception of military service in France, Bulleid worked continuously with Gresley until 1937. There is evidence that ideas flowed between Bulleid and Gresley during this period. For example, it is thought that the characteristic 'wedge' shape of the A4 was worked out by both men after a visit to Bugatti. He is also thought to have been the driving force behind the adoption of the Kylchap exhaust for many Gresley locomotives. Bulleid's main work at the LNER was with rolling stock construction and repair, and he produced the famous articulated dining and sleeping car sets.

In 1937 Bulleid moved to the Southern Railway to be their Chief Mechanical Engineer. At the Southern he was free to pursue a variety of novel innovations. Bulleid believed that steam's imperfections could be corrected - if they were identified and studied. Due to World War 2, imminent Nationalisation, and continued electrification on the Southern; Bulleid attempted to innovate too quickly. His most famous engines were his 'Merchant Navy' Pacifics. Although these were express passenger engines, they were officially designated as 'mixed traffic' due to their construction during the middle of World War 2. Their innovations included electric welding, air-smoothed casing, thermic syphons, American 'Boxpok' wheels, and oil bath chain-driven valve gear. The latter was due to a shortage of suitable gears in wartime Britain. The Merchant Navies (and smaller West Country / Battle of Britain Pacifics) had many successful features, including a successful 3-cylinder drive which avoided hammer blow, electric lighting, and steam-powered firedoors. Unfortunately Bulleid tried to achieve too much at once, and they also suffered many problems including a reputation for excessive slipping, and valve oil baths leakages and fires.

In 1942, Bulleid's 0-6-0 Q1 'Austerity' appeared. To save weight and material, all non-essentials were removed, resulting in a distinctive (some would say ugly) locomotive. The Q1 proved to be Britain's most powerful 0-6-0 design but only weighed 46 tons.

In an attempt to solve steam's deficits, Bulleid developed his 'Leader' Class. This had bogies powered by 3 cylinders, and a central cab for firing. Driver's cabs were located at both ends. The prototype was well advanced by the time of Nationalisation in 1948, but was already having problems. Shortly after trials began, the Leader was scrapped by British Railways.

On Nationalisation, Bulleid moved to the Irish State Railway (CIE) and stayed in Ireland until his retirement in 1958. Whilst in Ireland, Bulleid simplified the CIE's varied locomotive stock, and started a diesel conversion programme.

 

So a couple of Kiwis!

Severn Valley railway one of a lot

This locomotive is number 34053 Sir Keith Park 

 

Air Chief Marshal Sir Keith Rodney Park GCB, KBE, MC & Bar, DFC (15 June 1892 – 6 February 1975) was a New Zealand soldier, First World War flying ace and Second World War Royal Air Force commander. He was in operational command during two of the most significant air battles in the European theatre in the Second World War, helping to win the Battle of Britain and the Battle of Malta. In Germany, he was known as "the Defender of London"

 

Oliver Bulleid was born in 1882 at Invercargill in New Zealand, to British immigrants. His return to Britain in 1889 after the death of his father. He joined the Great Northern's Doncaster Works as an apprentice at age 18. On finishing his apprenticeship in 1906, Bulleid became an assistant to the locomotive superintendent and then works manager.

In 1908, he moved to the Westinghouse Works near Paris as Chief Draughtsman. He quickly became an engineer for the British displays at the Brussels and Turin trade fairs, before deciding to return to British railway work and became Nigel Gresley's personal assistant at the GNR in 1911.

With the exception of military service in France, Bulleid worked continuously with Gresley until 1937. There is evidence that ideas flowed between Bulleid and Gresley during this period. For example, it is thought that the characteristic 'wedge' shape of the A4 was worked out by both men after a visit to Bugatti. He is also thought to have been the driving force behind the adoption of the Kylchap exhaust for many Gresley locomotives. Bulleid's main work at the LNER was with rolling stock construction and repair, and he produced the famous articulated dining and sleeping car sets.

In 1937 Bulleid moved to the Southern Railway to be their Chief Mechanical Engineer. At the Southern he was free to pursue a variety of novel innovations. Bulleid believed that steam's imperfections could be corrected - if they were identified and studied. Due to World War 2, imminent Nationalisation, and continued electrification on the Southern; Bulleid attempted to innovate too quickly. His most famous engines were his 'Merchant Navy' Pacifics. Although these were express passenger engines, they were officially designated as 'mixed traffic' due to their construction during the middle of World War 2. Their innovations included electric welding, air-smoothed casing, thermic syphons, American 'Boxpok' wheels, and oil bath chain-driven valve gear. The latter was due to a shortage of suitable gears in wartime Britain. The Merchant Navies (and smaller West Country / Battle of Britain Pacifics) had many successful features, including a successful 3-cylinder drive which avoided hammer blow, electric lighting, and steam-powered firedoors. Unfortunately Bulleid tried to achieve too much at once, and they also suffered many problems including a reputation for excessive slipping, and valve oil baths leakages and fires.

In 1942, Bulleid's 0-6-0 Q1 'Austerity' appeared. To save weight and material, all non-essentials were removed, resulting in a distinctive (some would say ugly) locomotive. The Q1 proved to be Britain's most powerful 0-6-0 design but only weighed 46 tons.

In an attempt to solve steam's deficits, Bulleid developed his 'Leader' Class. This had bogies powered by 3 cylinders, and a central cab for firing. Driver's cabs were located at both ends. The prototype was well advanced by the time of Nationalisation in 1948, but was already having problems. Shortly after trials began, the Leader was scrapped by British Railways.

On Nationalisation, Bulleid moved to the Irish State Railway (CIE) and stayed in Ireland until his retirement in 1958. Whilst in Ireland, Bulleid simplified the CIE's varied locomotive stock, and started a diesel conversion programme.

 

So a couple of Kiwis!

comments (16)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 2 Sep 2014, 00:30
You have a lovely, heroic perspective on this fine-looking pile of iron, Bill.
Bill Phillips: From scrap to this. Not bad eh?
I like your treatment, and the sky!!
Bill Phillips: We will make a train fan out of you yet E
this is a spectacular image of this beautiful locomotive Bill... you did good... thanks for the history... i even read it all....petersmile
Bill Phillips: Well done!! She is a fine locomotive
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 2 Sep 2014, 06:39
And the clouds are also very excited and impressed with this fine lady! Does the driver smoking a cigarillo? Sorry, I don't read the information -too long and detailed for me and too difficult in English!
Bill Phillips: More likely a pipe Philine grin
  • Chris
  • England
  • 2 Sep 2014, 06:42
And to think only a couple of years ago this lovely thing was aught but a pile of scrap..
Bill Phillips: Indeed it was. You might fine this link interesting

http://www.southern-locomotives.co.uk/34053/34053_Restoration.html
  • blackdog
  • This Sceptred Isle
  • 2 Sep 2014, 07:47
And a very interesting pair of kiwis too! I preferred the B&W Bill ;o)
Bill Phillips: Well that is as expected Mike. smile
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 2 Sep 2014, 08:46
This would make an excellent jigsaw, Bill
Bill Phillips: I rather think it would Lisl
  • gutteridge
  • where latitude and attitude meet
  • 2 Sep 2014, 09:16
I really like this image Bill. I love the way the lens has stretched the image on the left. The lines of the train are very pleasing and the large 'blinkers' are a joy. I am also drawn to the separate worlds of the passengers ambling along the platform, oblivious to the engineer who appears to be shuffling white discs. He too cannot see the passengers. I might have liked the other train cropped out. One of your best old chum.
Bill Phillips: I struggle to find words to express my pleasure that you like this picture Chad
Your shot is excellent. The sky is a delight.
Bill Phillips: An English summer sky Mary
What a fabulous capture with this perspective Bill!
Bill Phillips: Thank you kindly Richard. wide angle has its uses!
You did a good job on this, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Cheers Frank!
A very good shot Bill, showing her at her best. Actually I should have said Sir Keith I suppose. Lots to enjoy in this picture including the old sign and wagon end on the left side.
Bill Phillips: Kidderminster Station on the SVR is a great place Brian
A great follow up on yesterday's post Bill.
Bill Phillips: I'm obliged Fred
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Sep 2014, 19:31
It's wonderful that these locomotives are being renovated
Bill Phillips: It is a labour of love....and a lot of time and money
Very nicely cranked up image.
Bill Phillips: Ummm yes...thanks Martin
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Sep 2014, 21:14
Interesting history of Bulleid; I never knew he was a New Zealander. Actually, I never knew much about him at all apart from his Southern locos. Looks to be a fitting loco for Sir Keith Rodney Park.
Bill Phillips: Nor did I. Keith Park is someone else who seems not to have the recognition he deserves

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