yellowbear

20 Apr 2014 93 views
 
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photoblog image St Michael's Church Stoke Prior

St Michael's Church Stoke Prior

At various times in the 19th century the church underwent much rebuilding and repair, the north and west walls being rebuilt, the nave reroofed, a new vestry added, and a new south porch being erected in place of the ancient porch, the woodwork of which now serves as a lych-gate.

The 14th-century east window is of five lights under a pointed head filled with net tracery, and has been considerably restored. The north-east window is a 13th-century lancet with widely splayed internal jambs. The pointed segmental rear arch has apparently been lowered.

The pointed doorway into the vestry of a single chamfered order has been recut, and a straight joint in the walling between it and the lancet window possibly marks the length of the former chancel. The south window is of two lights under a traceried head of the 14th century. Below it are the 13th-century piscina and sedilia; the former has a rough trefoiled head, a circular basin and a modern shelf. The three sedilia are divided by detached octagonal shafts supporting pointed and moulded heads; above the shafts, in the spandrels, are small grotesque crouching figures. A moulded string-course runs along the wall face on either side of the sanctuary, and to the east of the 14th-century window in the south wall are signs of a blocked 13th-century lancet window. Square clasping buttresses support the angles of the east wall; their upper halves with the gable end have been renewed. The archway into the north chapel has jambs with bowtels and a half-round shaft on the inner face; the west jamb appears to be the original transitional one, the capital of the half-shaft being carved with a pointed leaf decoration and the other capitals with bold projecting flowers. In the east jamb the bases differ slightly and may be later, and the capital of the half-shaft here is plain. The two-centred drop arch has been widened and is obviously later. The jambs of the tower arch, though of greater thickness, are similar to those opposite. The capitals are, however, quite different, some being scalloped and others foliated. The arch is pointed and of three orders with a moulded label. The chancel arch is probably a 14th-century alteration of an earlier one and has been much repaired with modern stonework.

 

Info from British History online 

St Michael's Church Stoke Prior

At various times in the 19th century the church underwent much rebuilding and repair, the north and west walls being rebuilt, the nave reroofed, a new vestry added, and a new south porch being erected in place of the ancient porch, the woodwork of which now serves as a lych-gate.

The 14th-century east window is of five lights under a pointed head filled with net tracery, and has been considerably restored. The north-east window is a 13th-century lancet with widely splayed internal jambs. The pointed segmental rear arch has apparently been lowered.

The pointed doorway into the vestry of a single chamfered order has been recut, and a straight joint in the walling between it and the lancet window possibly marks the length of the former chancel. The south window is of two lights under a traceried head of the 14th century. Below it are the 13th-century piscina and sedilia; the former has a rough trefoiled head, a circular basin and a modern shelf. The three sedilia are divided by detached octagonal shafts supporting pointed and moulded heads; above the shafts, in the spandrels, are small grotesque crouching figures. A moulded string-course runs along the wall face on either side of the sanctuary, and to the east of the 14th-century window in the south wall are signs of a blocked 13th-century lancet window. Square clasping buttresses support the angles of the east wall; their upper halves with the gable end have been renewed. The archway into the north chapel has jambs with bowtels and a half-round shaft on the inner face; the west jamb appears to be the original transitional one, the capital of the half-shaft being carved with a pointed leaf decoration and the other capitals with bold projecting flowers. In the east jamb the bases differ slightly and may be later, and the capital of the half-shaft here is plain. The two-centred drop arch has been widened and is obviously later. The jambs of the tower arch, though of greater thickness, are similar to those opposite. The capitals are, however, quite different, some being scalloped and others foliated. The arch is pointed and of three orders with a moulded label. The chancel arch is probably a 14th-century alteration of an earlier one and has been much repaired with modern stonework.

 

Info from British History online 

comments (15)

It certainly is indicative of it's time. The chairs - though they look a tad uncomfortable, are really cool!
Bill Phillips: A lot of churches want to get rid of pews, which are a Victorian addition to many of them. By having chairs it makes the use of the space more flexible.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 20 Apr 2014, 07:09
This is so beautiful, love the warm colours and the HDR.
Bill Phillips: This is one of a series I took for someone who now lives abroad but whose parents are buried here.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 Apr 2014, 07:31
HDR works well for church interiors
Bill Phillips: It does Chris and is pretty awful for everything else as my upcoming series will show in the near future
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 20 Apr 2014, 07:33
I'm sure that this beautiful, old church will be filled with attendents at the Easter service today as the churches in our country. And we will be listening to much fine music- today and tomorrow. I'll be listening to the organ music played by the famous British organist Jane Parker- Smith tonight in our Lambertikirche.
Bill Phillips: I am sure it will be Philine. We are having all the family here today for Sunday lunch which will be nice. Traditional Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding!
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 Apr 2014, 08:25
A fine "Church Sunday" submission, Bill.
Bill Phillips: I am pleased you approve Ray.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 Apr 2014, 08:27
Interesting combination of tiles and wooden boards for the floor. Quite unusual.

I am a bit worried about your reply to Tiff!
Bill Phillips: I am guessing they took the pews out and had to cover the floor with something and tiles would have cost a fortune.

I recommend when the series starts you wear dark glasses
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 20 Apr 2014, 08:51
was looking in the spandrels for the small grotesque crouching figures expecting to see the other stooges. Luckily, the scene remains unspoilt.
Bill Phillips: Happily that is the case. One has to show some respect for this fine building
It will be filled today for Easter services. The chairs would turn me off.
Bill Phillips: Less uncomfortable than the pews probably were Mary
This has the lot-fine tiled isle, stonework and a panelled roof
Bill Phillips: All carefully restored by the Victorians
Brilliant shot Bill
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Janet. Pleased you like it
This is a fine old church Bill, some very old bits in it, but have you noticed when some of us feature churches how many were 'renovated' by the Victorians.
Bill Phillips: I think most of our parish churches are Victorian makeovers Brian
So beautiful Bill! HDR works very well here.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Richard. It does seem to work well in churches
Oh GAWD,not more HDR to come.
Bill Phillips: Nothing wrong with HDR, when it is done beautifully like it is here
This is just amazing Bill...thanks for sharing and hope you had a lovely Easter
Bill Phillips: We did indeed Ronky, had the family over for Easter Sunday so that was nice
Your HDR looks great on this photo.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Jacquelyn Ann. Seems to work well for church interiors

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