yellowbear

03 Mar 2014 216 views
 
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photoblog image Bird having a paddle

Bird having a paddle

Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, two-legged, warm-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates. Aves ranks as the tetrapod class with the most living species, approximately ten thousand. Extant birds belong to the subclassNeornithes, living worldwide and ranging in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within the theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago.Most researchers agree that modern-day birds are the only living members of the Dinosauria clade.

Modern birds are characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a lightweight but strong skeleton. Extant birds have wings; the most recent species without wings was the moa, which is generally considered to have become extinct in the 16th century. Wings are evolved forelimbs, and most bird species can fly. Flightless birds include ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species. Some species of birds, particularly penguins and members of the Anatidae family, are adapted to swim. Birds also have digestive and respiratory systems that are uniquely adapted for flight. Some birds, especially corvids and parrots, are among the most intelligent animal species; several bird species make and use tools, and many social species culturally transmit knowledge across generations.

Many species annually migrate great distances, and many more perform shorter irregular movements. Birds are social, communicating with visual signals, calls, and songs, and participating in such social behaviours as cooperative breeding and hunting, flocking, and mobbing of predators. The vast majority of bird species are socially monogamous, usually for one breeding season at a time, sometimes for years, but rarely for life. Other species have polygynous ("many females") or, rarely,polyandrous ("many males") breeding systems. Eggs are usually laid in a nest and incubated by the parents. Most birds have an extended period of parental care after hatching.

Many species are economically important, mostly as game or poultry. Some species, particularly songbirds and parrots, are popular as pets. Another use of birds is harvesting guano (droppings) for use as a fertiliser. Birds prominently figurethroughout human culture. About 120–130 species have become extinct due to human activity since the 17th century, and hundreds more before then. Human acitivity threatens about 1,200 bird species with extinction, though efforts are underway toprotect them.

Bird having a paddle

Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, two-legged, warm-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates. Aves ranks as the tetrapod class with the most living species, approximately ten thousand. Extant birds belong to the subclassNeornithes, living worldwide and ranging in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich. The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within the theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago.Most researchers agree that modern-day birds are the only living members of the Dinosauria clade.

Modern birds are characterised by feathers, a beak with no teeth, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a lightweight but strong skeleton. Extant birds have wings; the most recent species without wings was the moa, which is generally considered to have become extinct in the 16th century. Wings are evolved forelimbs, and most bird species can fly. Flightless birds include ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species. Some species of birds, particularly penguins and members of the Anatidae family, are adapted to swim. Birds also have digestive and respiratory systems that are uniquely adapted for flight. Some birds, especially corvids and parrots, are among the most intelligent animal species; several bird species make and use tools, and many social species culturally transmit knowledge across generations.

Many species annually migrate great distances, and many more perform shorter irregular movements. Birds are social, communicating with visual signals, calls, and songs, and participating in such social behaviours as cooperative breeding and hunting, flocking, and mobbing of predators. The vast majority of bird species are socially monogamous, usually for one breeding season at a time, sometimes for years, but rarely for life. Other species have polygynous ("many females") or, rarely,polyandrous ("many males") breeding systems. Eggs are usually laid in a nest and incubated by the parents. Most birds have an extended period of parental care after hatching.

Many species are economically important, mostly as game or poultry. Some species, particularly songbirds and parrots, are popular as pets. Another use of birds is harvesting guano (droppings) for use as a fertiliser. Birds prominently figurethroughout human culture. About 120–130 species have become extinct due to human activity since the 17th century, and hundreds more before then. Human acitivity threatens about 1,200 bird species with extinction, though efforts are underway toprotect them.

comments (25)

  • Ray
  • Singapore, Singapore
  • 3 Mar 2014, 02:24
This boid is looking confused...as though it has dropped something and cannot find it.
Bill Phillips: I suspect drugs
Nice image, Bill!
Good info....
Bill Phillips: Thank you kindly E
Cracking shot....i like the colours of the water ....you caught him in a nice spot
Bill Phillips: This should be grass!
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 3 Mar 2014, 06:22
You and Richard S are on the same wavelength today with Black-headed Gulls in winter plumage. This one is just maturing
Bill Phillips: Indeed. The gull numbers in Worcester are gradually being reduced, so hopefully it may be the last of its line
  • Chris
  • Bathampton
  • 3 Mar 2014, 07:21
Oh gawd..
Bill Phillips: You are in awe clearly
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 3 Mar 2014, 07:21
It looks like you just hit him over the head with WTMI (way too much information), Bill. grin
Bill Phillips: If it makes him leave and not return it would be worth it Ginnie grin
a fine capture of this bird wading into the water. if you look at the beak, chin and chest line including the reflection, the resemblance to a right curly bracket is quite strong.
Bill Phillips: So it is!!!!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 3 Mar 2014, 07:38
I love the gentle blue colour.
Bill Phillips: Yes the water looks quite nice Philine
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Mar 2014, 07:58
All of that guff and I still don't know what type of bird it is! Looks like a pigeon that has lost its favourite pecking spot!
Bill Phillips: It is a young gull. Happily their numbers in Worcester are steadily being reduced so hopefully this picture will have historical value one day
Another walk on the beach is called for.
Bill Phillips: That would be good.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 3 Mar 2014, 08:54
Vogels:
Vogels zijn sterk aangepast aan het vliegen. Zo hebben moderne vogels geen tanden in de kaak maar een hoornsnavel, die lichter is, en een gespierde maag om te kunnen "kauwen". Beide eigenschappen kunnen we ook bij dinosauriërs vinden. Vele uitgestorven vormen hadden echter nog wel tanden. Bij de meeste vogels kan de bovenkaak naar boven buigen.

Botten van vogels bevatten veel holtes, waardoor ze licht maar toch sterk zijn.

Vogels hebben geen klauwen (vingers met nagels) aan hun voorpoten. De botten van de voorpoten vertonen aanpassingen zoals de Carpometacarpus (zie 24 in figuur Vogelskelet), een vergroeiing van handwortelbeentjes en middenhandbeentjes die typisch zijn voor vogels en die de voorpoten geschikt maken om mee te vliegen. De hoatzin is de enige vogelsoort die nog een klauwtje heeft. Loopvogels kunnen niet vliegen en missen dus deze speciale aanpassingen. Een andere opvallende aanpassing aan het vliegen is de borstbeenkam (Carina sterni, zie 6 in figuur Vogelskelet). Dit is een opvallend groot, bladvormig bot aan de buikzijde van de vogel. Dit bot dient als aanhechting van de grote borstspieren; dit zijn de spieren waarmee de vleugels naar omlaag bewogen worden.
Vliegen is een zeer arbeidsintensieve bezigheid die een goed hart- en longensysteem vereist om de vliegspieren van brandstof en zuurstof te voorzien en om geen zuurstofgebrek te hebben op grote hoogte (mensen hebben bijvoorbeeld wel last van een zuurstofgebrek als zij hoog klimmen). De stijve vogellongen werken beduidend efficiënter dan zoogdierlongen omdat de lucht er, door gebruik van flexibele buffers in de vorm van luchtzakken, en een aparte van kleppen voorziene in- en uitgang, altijd in één richting door stroomt, en er niet in- en weer uitgepompt wordt. Er is geen vermenging van zuurstofarme (oud) en (nieuwe) zuurstofrijke lucht. Hun longen bestaan inwendig uit een groot aantal buisvormige parabronchi, waar de gasuitwisseling plaatsvindt. De bloedstroom loopt daarbij tegengesteld aan de luchtstroom wat de uitwisseling bevordert. Vogels zijn in het bezit van voorste en achterste luchtzakken, waar de lucht via een tweedelige cyclus doorheen stroomt. De ademhaling gebeurt in twee cycli. Tijdens de eerste cyclus wordt de ingeademde lucht in de achterste luchtzakken gezogen en bij de uitademing verder geperst over de parabronchi in de longen. Tijdens de tweede cyclus wordt de lucht uit de parabronchi in de voorste luchtzakken gezogen en uitgeademd via de trachea. Er zijn sterke aanwijzingen dat deze eigenschap zich al bij de dinosauriërs (in het bijzonder de Avetheropoda) ontwikkeld heeft.
Great shot, wonderful reflection.
Bill Phillips: That's more or less what I said only in Dutch
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 3 Mar 2014, 09:33
Nice picture Billiam

Do you ever read the stuff that you put alongside your snaps
Bill Phillips: Thank you

Seldom
A fine shot Bill, I like the reflection! smile The birds having a paddle, but statistically he's upstream without one grin
Bill Phillips: Pleased you like it Martin, even without a paddle
  • gutteridge
  • where latitude and attitude meet
  • 3 Mar 2014, 10:16
This bird has a sad look about it Bill (daft I know), as if it fears its life-long friend has deserted or been drowned.
Bill Phillips: A drowned gull is a good gull
The gulls have drawn you in at last and provided you with one of the nicest shots ever on your blog.
Bill Phillips: Pleased you like it Mary. The number of gulls in Worcester is being reduced and hopefully one day they will be gone
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 3 Mar 2014, 13:08
So I'm assuming from your notes that this is an Ave rather than an Ave-Not? The bird was probably thinking that it would walk, as it was such a nice day.
Bill Phillips: Ave Maria for all i know Alan
This is beautiful Bill...A calming image! thanks for sharing!
Bill Phillips: Calm is good Ronky.
The bird's expression is priceless, Bill. I agree with Mary; one of your best.
Bill Phillips: Thank you. It was a filler really as i haven't taken much lately
2 of us with gulls today!
Bill Phillips: Indeed Sheila, and Richard Standley makes 3!
Unlike you,Bill,I'm lost for words...smile
Bill Phillips: Don't worry i'm sure Elizabeth will think of some
Well the picture's not bad, but all that narrative, at my age I can only manage three words at a time!
Bill Phillips: You aren't missing anything Brian
Fine capture indeed Bill! I really like the expression.
Bill Phillips: He has a suspicious air to me Richard
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Mar 2014, 19:31
When I saw the thumbnail I thought it was steam from a train. This is much more interesting smile
Bill Phillips: I am glad you think so, although I prefer trains to gulls grin
Juvenile herring gull?
Bill Phillips: Some sort of gull Tom and a young one
I like the wake, is it motorised? Could be a decoy Bill smile
Bill Phillips: It would at least not be able to breed if it was

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