yellowbear

17 Oct 2013 88 views
 
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photoblog image A load of balls

A load of balls

There used to be a quiz program on television called Catchphrase. As the contestants answered questions correctly parts of a picture were revealed  depicting a well know saying. The quizmaster, whose name I can't recall used to urge the contestants to "say what you see" On one occasion the picture revealed what appeared to be some spherical objects. "Say what you see" said the quiz master.

 

 

After a pause the contestant blurted out...."A load of balls!"

A load of balls

There used to be a quiz program on television called Catchphrase. As the contestants answered questions correctly parts of a picture were revealed  depicting a well know saying. The quizmaster, whose name I can't recall used to urge the contestants to "say what you see" On one occasion the picture revealed what appeared to be some spherical objects. "Say what you see" said the quiz master.

 

 

After a pause the contestant blurted out...."A load of balls!"

comments (19)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 17 Oct 2013, 07:36
Had you not smeared this image with mud it might have turned out to be a fine sort of self portrait
Bill Phillips: It was a bit dark at the time!
And what a load of balls it is too.
Bill Phillips: Spheres to you Shaw
powerful stuff Bill, very well!
Bill Phillips: Thanks very much JC
  • gutteridge
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 17 Oct 2013, 09:06
I have never watched this program Bill, but careful research ha discovered the following:-
Catchphrase is a British game show based on the short-lived U.S. game show of the same name. It originally aired on ITV in the United Kingdom between 12 January 1986 and 19 December 2002. It was presented by Northern Irish comedian Roy Walker from 1986–1999; followed by Nick Weir from 2000–2002, and Mark Curry in 2002.
In the original series, two contestants, one male and one female would have to identify the familiar phrase represented by a piece of animation accompanied by background music. The show's mascot, a golden robot called "Mr. Chips", appears in many of the animations. In the revived version of the show, the same format remains, but there are three contestants.
In August 2012, it was announced that Stephen Mulhern would host a revived version of the show beginning on 7 April 2013. On 21 August 2013, it was confirmed that Catchphrase has been re-commissioned for a second series, following the success of the first.[1]
Bill Phillips: I am obliged to you Ridge. We used to watch it with our Helen, who loved it. Actually it was quite good fun. roy Walker was a bit of a prat though
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk: where the sun rises first in England
  • 17 Oct 2013, 09:41
You do watch some rubbish TV Billiam.
Bill Phillips: It was either that or the labour party conference
I remember that programme, Bill. Wasn't the quizmaster Irish?

Great photo, you don't know what to look at first.
Bill Phillips: He was. He was supposed to be funny .....not sure that he was
  • Mary MacADNski
  • Beautiful Prince Edward Island, Canada
  • 17 Oct 2013, 11:31
That is pretty cool. Hope you took a bunch.
Bill Phillips: Of course. Balls everywhere Mary
  • Philine
  • United States
  • 17 Oct 2013, 12:02
a confusing photo with all the different reflections! Have been poems written on the windows? 'Quiz' seems to be a new popular game in the pubs as I read in Lincoln ..., a new sort of entertainment to invite the people into the pubs!
Spherical objects, globes, balls - there are different terms - but as lady I should avoid the last word because of its English connotations!
Bill Phillips: This folded stainless-steel triangular sculpture is the latest addition to Exeter High Street. Made by the artist Michael Fairfax, it has alternate 'wings' with verses from the Exeter Riddles which date from the circa 960AD, Exeter Book, the earliest known example of Anglo Saxon poetry in existence.

The Exeter Book is kept in the Cathedral Library, and has recently been copied, along with translations onto an interactive DVD Rom. The book is not quite complete, as it has been used as a mediaval carpenters chopping block, had glue spilt on it and suffered from scorching at some point. The riddles have been translated into modern English and engraved on the wings of the piece, in reverse. A careful choice of riddles was made, as many were either too long or obscene. The verses can be read, by looking at their reflection in the adjacent 'wing'. Between each pair of 'wings' is a polished, stainless-steel sphere on which is engraved the answer to the riddle.

The 6 meter high sculpture, which cost £65,000 (2005 cost) is part of the million pound plus refurbishment of the High Street. It was unveiled on 30 March 2005 by the leader of the City Council, Cllr. Roy Slack and the Chairman of Devon County Council, Cllr. Mike Knight. Its creator, Michael Fairfax said:
I really like what you've done with this one, Bill; very clever.
Bill Phillips: I just took a picture of what was there grin
Goodness gracious great balls of fire Bill... good song great reflections... you look slimmer in this shot....petersmile
Bill Phillips: You shake my teeth and rattle my brain

Slimmer.....must buy this statue.....,
We used to watch the programme from time to time with Roy Walker hosting, Chad found the same Wiki piece as me. Makes for a very good photograph young sir.
Bill Phillips: Our Helen used to love it so I ended up watching it too. It was harmless fun
Whatever you're smoking, can I have some please smile
Bill Phillips: OK Man
Quite confusing Bill! Is this a sculpture?
Bill Phillips: It is and is made from stainless steel.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 17 Oct 2013, 20:11
Riddle 44

A curiosity hangs by the thigh of a man, under its master's cloak. It is pierced through in the front; it is stiff and hard and it has a good standing-place. When the man pulls up his own robe above his knee, he means to poke with the head of his hanging thing that familiar hole of matching length which he has often filled before.

(answer: key - not what you might think! Very funny! I think this could be an inspiration for your blog!)
Bill Phillips: Hahahaha you are very naughty Philine smile
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 17 Oct 2013, 20:34
Exeter Book, Riddle 23

Ic eom wunderlicu wiht wifum on hyhte
neahbuendum nyt; nægum sceþþe
burgsittendra nymthe bonan anum.
Staþol min is steapheah stonde ic on bedde
neoðan ruh nathwær. Neþeð hwilum
ful cyrtenu ceorles dohtor
modwlonc meowle þæt heo on mec gripe
ræseð mec on reodne reafath min heafod
fegeð mec on fæsten. Feleþ sona
mines gemotes seo þe mec nearwað
wif wundenlocc. Wæt bið þæt eage.




I am a wondrous creature, a joy to women,
useful to neighbors; not any citizens
do I injure, except my slayer.
Very high is my foundation. I stand in a bed,
hair underneath somewhere. Sometimes ventures
a fully beautiful churl's daughter,
licentious maid, that she grabs onto me,
rushes me to the redness, ravages my head,
fixes me in confinement. She soon feels
my meeting, she who forced me in,
the curly-haired woman. Wet is her eye.

(answer: onion or ...)
Bill Phillips: I am not good at riddles! Fascinating though isn't it?
  • Alan
  • Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • 17 Oct 2013, 21:31
Wasn't it Roy Walker? He was well respected, I believe. This is far from a load of old balls, though. It's actually quite good. That's at least two images this week. Keep it up.
Bill Phillips: It was. Chad did some research.

Not a chance
A fairly apt description smile
Bill Phillips: I try to be accurate Tom
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 18 Oct 2013, 10:21
Oh, excuse me having been so naughty, but I thought it were old literature!
Bill Phillips: wink grin
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 Oct 2013, 06:36
Even more attractive gleaming, Bill.
Bill Phillips: shiny load of old balls

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