yellowbear

11 Oct 2013 120 views
 
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photoblog image Exeter 3 of some

Exeter 3 of some

This is one of the oldest churches in Exeter and was consecrated by Bishop Leofric on 6th July 1065. As Bishop Leofric came from Burgundy, the church was dedicated to St Martin of Tours, the patron saint of beggars. Some original Anglo-Saxon stonework in the walls remains from this period including the use of Beer stone. The church is on a cramped and skewed site, forcing the nave and chancel onto different axis.

Most of the church was refurbished between 1420 and 1455, including the west window which was presented by Bishop Lacy, while the furnishing dates from the 17th and 18th-centuries. The roughcast tower is built of red Heavitree sandstone. The roof is a typical Devon style 'wagon' roof, although the mullions are made of wood, rather than stone. The porch was added in the 19th century.

Inside, the altar table, altar rails and communion wall seats are Jacobean in period. The font was made in two halves, the upper marble section of a later date than the lower part. The church has several interesting memorials, including one to the Hooper family, and the window on the south side has the coat of arms of the Kingdon family, probably donated by 'Iron' Sam Kingdon. The coat of arms of Charles I can be found on the south wall, probably after it was hidden in the tower after the Civil War. The ten commandments have been found under the paintwork behind the altar. There is a gallery at the west end, under the window. The window was in a poor state of repair – in the 1970's it was recommended that it be replaced, but after consideration, it was preserved and 75% of the original remains.

The single bell weighs about 11 cwt (550 kilos) and was cast in 1675 by Thomas Pennington III from Exeter. The defunct parish of St Martins stretched from Broadgate to St Martins Lane and the High Street to Cathedral Yard and covered only 1.75 acres (0.7 hectares). In 1821 there were 329 residents in 62 houses - now all the houses are shops and offices.

Exeter 3 of some

This is one of the oldest churches in Exeter and was consecrated by Bishop Leofric on 6th July 1065. As Bishop Leofric came from Burgundy, the church was dedicated to St Martin of Tours, the patron saint of beggars. Some original Anglo-Saxon stonework in the walls remains from this period including the use of Beer stone. The church is on a cramped and skewed site, forcing the nave and chancel onto different axis.

Most of the church was refurbished between 1420 and 1455, including the west window which was presented by Bishop Lacy, while the furnishing dates from the 17th and 18th-centuries. The roughcast tower is built of red Heavitree sandstone. The roof is a typical Devon style 'wagon' roof, although the mullions are made of wood, rather than stone. The porch was added in the 19th century.

Inside, the altar table, altar rails and communion wall seats are Jacobean in period. The font was made in two halves, the upper marble section of a later date than the lower part. The church has several interesting memorials, including one to the Hooper family, and the window on the south side has the coat of arms of the Kingdon family, probably donated by 'Iron' Sam Kingdon. The coat of arms of Charles I can be found on the south wall, probably after it was hidden in the tower after the Civil War. The ten commandments have been found under the paintwork behind the altar. There is a gallery at the west end, under the window. The window was in a poor state of repair – in the 1970's it was recommended that it be replaced, but after consideration, it was preserved and 75% of the original remains.

The single bell weighs about 11 cwt (550 kilos) and was cast in 1675 by Thomas Pennington III from Exeter. The defunct parish of St Martins stretched from Broadgate to St Martins Lane and the High Street to Cathedral Yard and covered only 1.75 acres (0.7 hectares). In 1821 there were 329 residents in 62 houses - now all the houses are shops and offices.

comments (21)

I like this image Bill you have framed it nicely... the marble front windows are spectacular... as you said the church does look a bit cramped in... thanks for the history Paulinesmile....petersmile
Bill Phillips: The city has developed around it. The church is almost opposite the cathedral. it is no longer used but is open tothe public
Thank Philine for the history too Bill...
i had a brain fart....re-petersmile
Bill Phillips: Hahahaha
She looks like she's just been wedged in the town circle! Interesting info!
Bill Phillips: It was wedged in I think E. It is almost opposite the cathedral and isn't used as a church any more
  • Lisl
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Oct 2013, 06:24
Nice to see an open Church, Bill. So many are locked these days
Bill Phillips: It is open but is npo longer used as a church Lisl
  • Chris
  • United States
  • 11 Oct 2013, 07:12
I am trying to remember whether I've been inside or not. I hope you did
Bill Phillips: I did as you will see tomorrow.
it does look like they were hard pressed for space. great job at preserving this place.
Bill Phillips: It is a little gem Ayush
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 11 Oct 2013, 07:23
Oh, this is the entrance to Ship Street where Francis Drake used to drink his pints in the Ship Inn? A fine HDR photo!
Bill Phillips: And the pub where my brother had his stag night back in 1969. Ship Street is to the left
  • Aussie
  • Australia
  • 11 Oct 2013, 09:04
Like Chris I can't remember if I went inside
Bill Phillips: Well I did and you can see the results tomorrow Aussie. I have to confess in all the years I lived in Exeter and all the times Ihave visited I had never even noticed the church before!
  • gutteridge
  • Where latitude and attitude meet
  • 11 Oct 2013, 09:19
I presume that beer stone is a residue left over from the manufacture of that world famous drink.
Bill Phillips: You would presume incorrectly, nor does Heavitree sandstone come from an overweight Larch
  • Mary MacADNski
  • Beautiful Prince Edward Island, Canada
  • 11 Oct 2013, 10:53
Very interesting stonework.
Bill Phillips: Rather nice isn't it? Unusual mixture
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 11 Oct 2013, 11:50
I gather the population must be a bit more. The place has a university as far as I know. Great old place.
Bill Phillips: The Parish of St Martins probably has virtually no population at all now. Exeter has a population just over 100,000 and a very fine University
  • Bonnie
  • United States
  • 11 Oct 2013, 12:10
DOF pulls you right in. Terrific angle.
Bill Phillips: Thanks very much Bonnie
Nice shot Bill, I like the red stone. It's quite something when you consider it's nearly 1,000 yrs old!
Bill Phillips: It has been restored beautifully Martin
It's a lovely looking place, Bill. I'll have to get up there for sure when I have a day spare which doesn't happen very often.
Thanks for the history as well.
Bill Phillips: Do pay a visit, Exeter is a fine city
What a fascinating history this church has, Bill. I'm so glad you did go in and that we'll be seeing the interior tomorrow.
Bill Phillips: I hope yo will like it Beverly
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 Oct 2013, 14:49
With the narrow street this has a bit of the look of the Shambles in York Bill
Bill Phillips: Ship lane is quite narrow but Exeter boasts the narrowest street in the world
Yep, definitely my sort of place. I like that lovely window above the door.
Bill Phillips: You'd love it Brian
good to see it flourishing in the middle of town Bill. Very attractive building
Bill Phillips: It is opposite the Cathedral and as a church is now not used but it is open to the public
What a beautiful structure Bill!
Bill Phillips: Lovely isn't it Richard?
One of these days they'll turn it into a pub.
Bill Phillips: Such cynicism in one so young
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 15 Oct 2013, 03:59
A fine image, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Thank you sir

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