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23 Feb 2013 65 views
 
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photoblog image Church of St James Welland 1/3

Church of St James Welland 1/3

There has been a Church of Saint James at Welland since 1300. The Old Church was situated at the end of Welland Court Lane, off the Upton Road and about a mile or so from the present Church. Due to an increase in the population of the village in the late 1800s and the deterioration of the Old Church, it was decided to look for another site.

Mr Abraham Watkins, Churchwarden, of Welland Villa (now Church Villa), generously gave the plot of land on which the new Church of Saint James was built. The work was commenced in 1873 and the foundation stone was laid on St. James' Day, July 25th of that year. It was consecrated on 2nd April 1875.

The architect was J. West Hugnall of Worcester, the builders were Wall and Hook, of Brimscombe, Gloucestershire and the cost was approximately £4000. This was raised by private donations and small grants from the Worcestershire Church Extensions Society and the Incorporated Church Building Society.

The tower has a wooden spire and houses  six bells by John Taylor and Co. of Loughborough. The structure is of Malvern Stone, taken from the Gullet Quarry,  Castlemorton and faced with Bath stone. The nave is 61 feet by 25 feet, has four bays resting on round piers with alternating bands of blue and white stone. It is in the early decorated style of the 13th century.                                                        

The east window was given by the Countess Beauchamp and is by Hardman and Co., and the stained glass window in the south aisle, dedicated to Benjamin Hall and his wife  Elizabeth, is by Charles Earner Kempe. The other stained glass window in the south aisle, came from the Church of the Good Shepherd in Upper Welland (now a private house) in the 1970s. The window in the north aisle and given by the Reverend J. Coombes, is by Edward Green of Hereford.

The clock on the tower was added to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

The church plate consists of a handsome silver-gilt chalice with a high spire-like cover, both of elaborate repousse work, with the hall marks for 1613; a blown glass flagon with a silver-gilt lid, neck-band and foot, with the hall marks of 1582, both bearing the Taylor arms. There are also a silver cup of the usual type dated 1571 and a modern silver-gilt cup, flagon and paten — the last three a gift of a Mrs. Forsdyke - and a modern platen partly made from an old one melted down.

Electric lighting was added in 1930 by J. H. Taylor and Co., Huddersfield. The church had previously been lit by oil lamps suspended on chains between the columns. Holes in the choir stalls can still be seen where there had been stands for oil lamps.

The organ is by W. G. Vowles of Castle Street, Bristol and is used regularly.

There are two war memorial plaques in the north aisle and books commemorating the villagers who gave their lives in the Great War and World War Two. On the south and north walls are two memorials taken from the Old Church and there are also three brass memorial plaques.

In the porch is a list of Vicars from 1300 to the present day and just inside the door to the Church is a picture of the laying of the foundation stone and some of the previous

Church of St James Welland 1/3

There has been a Church of Saint James at Welland since 1300. The Old Church was situated at the end of Welland Court Lane, off the Upton Road and about a mile or so from the present Church. Due to an increase in the population of the village in the late 1800s and the deterioration of the Old Church, it was decided to look for another site.

Mr Abraham Watkins, Churchwarden, of Welland Villa (now Church Villa), generously gave the plot of land on which the new Church of Saint James was built. The work was commenced in 1873 and the foundation stone was laid on St. James' Day, July 25th of that year. It was consecrated on 2nd April 1875.

The architect was J. West Hugnall of Worcester, the builders were Wall and Hook, of Brimscombe, Gloucestershire and the cost was approximately £4000. This was raised by private donations and small grants from the Worcestershire Church Extensions Society and the Incorporated Church Building Society.

The tower has a wooden spire and houses  six bells by John Taylor and Co. of Loughborough. The structure is of Malvern Stone, taken from the Gullet Quarry,  Castlemorton and faced with Bath stone. The nave is 61 feet by 25 feet, has four bays resting on round piers with alternating bands of blue and white stone. It is in the early decorated style of the 13th century.                                                        

The east window was given by the Countess Beauchamp and is by Hardman and Co., and the stained glass window in the south aisle, dedicated to Benjamin Hall and his wife  Elizabeth, is by Charles Earner Kempe. The other stained glass window in the south aisle, came from the Church of the Good Shepherd in Upper Welland (now a private house) in the 1970s. The window in the north aisle and given by the Reverend J. Coombes, is by Edward Green of Hereford.

The clock on the tower was added to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

The church plate consists of a handsome silver-gilt chalice with a high spire-like cover, both of elaborate repousse work, with the hall marks for 1613; a blown glass flagon with a silver-gilt lid, neck-band and foot, with the hall marks of 1582, both bearing the Taylor arms. There are also a silver cup of the usual type dated 1571 and a modern silver-gilt cup, flagon and paten — the last three a gift of a Mrs. Forsdyke - and a modern platen partly made from an old one melted down.

Electric lighting was added in 1930 by J. H. Taylor and Co., Huddersfield. The church had previously been lit by oil lamps suspended on chains between the columns. Holes in the choir stalls can still be seen where there had been stands for oil lamps.

The organ is by W. G. Vowles of Castle Street, Bristol and is used regularly.

There are two war memorial plaques in the north aisle and books commemorating the villagers who gave their lives in the Great War and World War Two. On the south and north walls are two memorials taken from the Old Church and there are also three brass memorial plaques.

In the porch is a list of Vicars from 1300 to the present day and just inside the door to the Church is a picture of the laying of the foundation stone and some of the previous

comments (17)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 23 Feb 2013, 00:26
Strewth, Bill!
That seems a rather elaborate tower for such a modest little clock face.

[Love how you got bored and just cut off the blurb in mid-sentence]
Bill Phillips: Hahaha so I did!
What a beautiful church Bill and you have framed it in perfect light... it was nice of Mr. Abraham Watkins to give the plot of land to build it... they got a lot for only £4000....petersmile
Bill Phillips: £4000 in those days would be the equivalent of about £200'000 now Peter!
Lovely church - very interesting history. I like the rock wall.
Bill Phillips: It is rather a nice building and interesting inside, well I thought so you will be able to judge for yourself tomorrowsmile
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 23 Feb 2013, 07:33
I could imagine to be in Germany - it is a fine church with a well documented history - the sky is impressive!
Bill Phillips: It is a lovely church and rather nice inside too
  • Chris
  • England
  • 23 Feb 2013, 08:23
This is a truly fine example of Victorian church design
Bill Phillips: Isn't it just? The inside is rather unusual
This description of the church has a little softer and less clinical feel to it than The famous Pevsner type descriptions. I always feel reading NP's descriptions that he was on a race to cover all important county buildings without slowing down and putting some personal emotion into his mammoth series.

I'm often fond of Victorian buildings but Victorian churches less so.
Bill Phillips: I like Victorian churches and Victorian buildings in general. This one I particularly liked.
It's going to be a long weekend.
Bill Phillips: Interminable
Reminds me of a church in my hometown.
Bill Phillips: There is something "colonial" about it wink
its a beautiful place and the light is perfect. great exposure
Bill Phillips: It a very nice building Ayush. Interesting inside too
Nice bit of Victoriana
Bill Phillips: I like things Victorian Tom
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 Feb 2013, 16:13
It looks an interesting building. Are we going to be seeing pictures of the inside?
Bill Phillips: Indeed you are Anne
Quite a lovely church Bill coming out so nicely on this sky!
Bill Phillips: It was a dull day so lightroom came into use!
Quite an attractive church isn't it. We have had a tour round the John Taylor bell foundry at Loughborough, quite an interesting place.
Bill Phillips: Bell making is very interesting isn't it?
Nicely placed against that sky, Bill.
Bill Phillips: I am obliged to you sir
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 23 Feb 2013, 21:26
An interesting history of a fine church. The spire is very impressive.
Bill Phillips: In all the years I have lived in this area I had never actually been to Welland and this made me stop when I did just recently
Love the sky Bill!
Bill Phillips: Thank you Sarah
Excellent composition & capture, Bill. Lots of history to this fine church.
Bill Phillips: It is a very fine Victorian Church Sue

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