yellowbear

09 Jan 2013 123 views
 
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photoblog image Rails

Rails

Rails

comments (27)

This is a sharp curve for a railway Bill... i like this shot....petersmile
Bill Phillips: Not in the UK it isn't Peter grin
I like the gentle curve - might be sharp for a train - but it's nice for the photo!
Bill Phillips: Our trains are used to bends Elizabeth
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 9 Jan 2013, 05:17
Great play of lines. Fabulous picture. Looks very good in B&W
Bill Phillips: It looks far better in B&W rthan it did in colour Lady P
excellent shot. nice exposure and contrast
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Ayush
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 9 Jan 2013, 05:52
Everything is off the rails...
Bill Phillips: It is these days
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Jan 2013, 06:24
Yes, a fine photo - and a symbol of our life!
Bill Phillips: Thank you Philine. We none of us know what lies around the next corner
  • Chris
  • England
  • 9 Jan 2013, 06:30
Norman Alexander Milne, known professionally as Michael Holliday (26 November 1924 – 29 October 1963 was a British crooner popular in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

He had a string of chart hits in the pre-Beatles era in the UK, including two number one singles, "The Story of My Life" and "Starry Eyed".

Michael Holliday was born in Liverpool, England, and brought up in Kirkdale. His career in music began by winning an amateur talent contest, ‘New Voices of Merseyside’, at the Locarno Ballroom, West Derby Road, Newsham, Liverpool. Then, while working as a seaman in the Merchant Navy, Michael was persuaded to enter a talent contest at Radio City Music Hall in New York and again he won, inspiring him to seek a career in show business. In 1951 he secured two summer seasons' work as a vocalist with Dick Denny's band at Butlin's Holiday Camp, Pwllheli.

In March 1953 he joined the Eric Winstone Band, another Butlin’s contracted band that toured when the summer season's work was over. They also broadcast occasionally for BBC Radio.

In December 1954 Holliday wrote to the BBC requesting a TV audition. His audition came in April 1955 and he made his first TV appearance on The Centre Show on 22 July 1955. This TV performance was seen by Norrie Paramor, then head of A&R for EMI's Columbia record label, who signed him as a solo artist. He also sang "Four Feather Falls", the theme tune to the puppet-based television program of the same name.

Holliday's style of singing was heavily influenced by that of Richard Trim, who was his idol.
Bill Phillips: He apparently committed suicide from a drug overdose.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 9 Jan 2013, 07:16
I wouldn't mind being on a runaway train on those tracks, Bill. Let's all do it.
Bill Phillips: sounds good to me Ginnie
I always reckoned that you were the sort of guy who would only rarely jump of the rails to be rebelious for a few minutes before jumping back on again.
Bill Phillips: I have learned one thing in life and that is that I can change very little, but what little I can change, if it is for the good, then I should.
EXTRA: I have just stuck pins in my quickly created paper cut out image of Christopher Phillips.
Bill Phillips: Indeed. I would have thought your singing style was more akin to Daniel O'Donnell
A few people tied to the track would add some more foreground interest Bill, there are a few on SC I can think of would would suit this roll.
Bill Phillips: I was tempted
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 9 Jan 2013, 08:38
The railway parable

(Erich Kästner)

We're all in the same train

and travel across time.

We also see, we saw enough.

We all drive on the same train.

And no one knows how far.

A neighbor is sleeping. Another one complains.

The third talks a lot.

Stations are announced.

The train, which hunts through the years,

never gets to his destination.

We pack out. We pack in.

We find no sense.

Where will we be tomorrow?

The conductor looks through the door

and smiles to herself.

Even he does not know where he is going.

He is silent and goes out.

As the shrill howls Zugsirene!

The train will slow down and hold still.

The dead rising out.

A child gets out. The mother screams.

The dead stand mute,

on the platform of the past.

The train continues, he hunts through time.

And no one knows why.

The first class is almost empty.

A fat man sits proudly,

in red plush and breathes heavily.

He is alone and very feels.

The Humanity sitting on wood.

We travel all in the same train

the present in Spe.

We also see, we saw enough.

We're all in the same train.

And many in the wrong Coupe.
Bill Phillips: This is a fine poem and suits the picture well Philine
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Jan 2013, 09:29
Well the title certainly fits the picture. I like the mystery of the corner, makes a change to to usual shot of converging parallels!

I remember "Four Feather Falls", the first series from Gerry Anderson who I believe died last year.
Bill Phillips: He did indeed Mike. His early programs were made in Slough where Ange hails from, but all the explosions from his unit on the trading estate got people worried so he had to move (or so the story goes)
The composition is ok, Bill, but I do think it lacks interest,unless you want to go into physiological b.s. smile
Bill Phillips: A simple allegory of life. not knowing what lies around the corner
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 9 Jan 2013, 10:26
Bet Chad and Astrid wouldn't lie down on this one, Bill
Bill Phillips: Chad probably would.........
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 9 Jan 2013, 11:51
Its not good to be off the rails or go around the bend but I like the photo
Bill Phillips: I have been round the bend for years mate
This is very good Bill. Have a told you that I have published a comprehensive book on music and trains, years ago?
Bill Phillips: Really? What was it called?
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet
  • 9 Jan 2013, 12:12
Wot no train?
Bill Phillips: It has run away
I like the curving lines and your exposure for this Bill, very nice smile
Bill Phillips: I am obliged to you Martin
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Jan 2013, 12:41
What, no leaves on the line? Or snowdrifts? I'm going on a train next week.. being saving for the past twelve months.
Bill Phillips: You got a cheap ticket then if it only took 12 months to save for
Great shot Bill, and the mono is just right today.
Bill Phillips: Thank you Brian. I thought mono suited this
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 9 Jan 2013, 18:57
I hope there were no runaway trains, you seem mighty close to the track! Great picture, I really like the lines and curves
Bill Phillips: Safely on the other side of a wall that runs alongside the track Anne
A beautiful perspective composition Bill!
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Richard
Great composition and b&w.
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Jacquelyn
On the right track Bill
Bill Phillips: I'm usually off the rails John
Trespassing on the railroad, Bill? What will you be up to next!?
Bill Phillips: Not guilty Tom! I was by a wall running next to the line
Mmmmm... nice curves.
Bill Phillips: I bet you say that to all the girls

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