yellowbear

02 Aug 2012 74 views
 
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photoblog image The Workhouse 4

The Workhouse 4

When they came to the workhouse families were split up. Able bodied men in one wing, deserving poor men , then Deserving women, finally able bodied women. Children were kept at the rear of the building. In later years the deserving poor were, in theory, allowed to be together but I am not sure it happened much in practice.

The Workhouse 4

When they came to the workhouse families were split up. Able bodied men in one wing, deserving poor men , then Deserving women, finally able bodied women. Children were kept at the rear of the building. In later years the deserving poor were, in theory, allowed to be together but I am not sure it happened much in practice.

comments (21)

I have just had a chance to go over your last three posts on the Workhouse Bill... i found a lot of history in this series as well as four fabulous B&W photos with great light and shadows....petersmile
Bill Phillips: Thanks Peter. The workhouses were a harsh solution to the problem of poverty
  • Chris
  • United States
  • 2 Aug 2012, 05:58
I think the word joyless springs to mind
Bill Phillips: I doubt there was a lot of laughter Chris
  • Richard T
  • Back in Leicester UK
  • 2 Aug 2012, 06:23
I rememebr hearing about the splitting up of families when i visiteds this place many years ago. You are doing a fine job with this series bill.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Richard. I didn't know much about Workhouses before I went. I don't know much now but I would like to
This photo is appropriately sober, given your text!
Bill Phillips: I hope i'm not depressing everybody too much
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 2 Aug 2012, 07:26
At first I saw the night pots under the plank beds - you captured the poorness and tristesse of that hard, 'joyless' life very well by your treatment. Yesterday I read some details on i-net about the Victorian workhouses.
Bill Phillips: The beds are actually from a hospital of the period but are similar to what would have been there. I think tristesse sums up life here rather well
I suppose that at its conception, the workhouse was some sort of kindness to distress people. It is hard to imagine that, but I'm sure that the intention was to help those in desperate need.
Bill Phillips: There was also a desire to reduce the cost of the poor law payments that fell on the Parishes.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 2 Aug 2012, 08:35
I imagine this was one of the "better" workhouses, Bill?
Bill Phillips: I believe it was the first and the blueprint for those that followed
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 2 Aug 2012, 08:41
A fabulous picture again.Maybe they can use your pictures in the brochure....
Bill Phillips: Thank you Lady P. I have had pictures used by the NT...but only for the bacon buttie hills grin
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Aug 2012, 09:35
Good photo Bill, I note they kept the able bodied men and women as far away as possible!
Bill Phillips: Very much so Mike. For those fit to work the workhouse was designed to be somewhere they would want to leave.
No inside loos then Bill.
Bill Phillips: The Master of the house had one in his private rooms and was, by all accounts, very proud of it.
Fine processing in this series Bill.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Fred, pleased you think so
Another fine shot Bill, love the lighting here!
Bill Phillips: I was lucky with the light Martin
I have read quite a lot about workhouses and your narrative sums it all up. There was no privacy at all if rooms were like this.
Bill Phillips: None at all Brian
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 2 Aug 2012, 12:41
Life sounds like a lot of fun here - not! I like the Guzunders.
Bill Phillips: It was not a soft option
How sad that is and your black and white is perfect.
Bill Phillips: Life in the 19th century wasn't easy
Super shot again, the inmates have just gone to breakfast gruel and a slice of stale bread if they passed the bed inspection.
Bill Phillips: Actually the food they got wasn't too bad as they grew most of it themselves
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 2 Aug 2012, 18:29
This series is great, very thought provoking.
Bill Phillips: It is sobering to think that they only went out of use finally after WW2
What a strong atmosphere Bill! Well done.
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Richard
Meanwhile, in another part of the city... the undeserving rich, eh?
Bleak.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 5 Aug 2012, 06:40
Chamber pots look good in monochrome, Bill...
Bill Phillips: They don't smell any better though

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