yellowbear

01 Aug 2012 164 views
 
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photoblog image The Workhouse 3

The Workhouse 3

Children received basic education, probably more than they would have received outside.

The Workhouse 3

Children received basic education, probably more than they would have received outside.

comments (22)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 1 Aug 2012, 00:51
Ah! Kid's hammocks!
Bill Phillips: Haha...Now that's an idea
And this.
Bill Phillips: I'm obliged Graeme
I really like the low lighting you're using for these- the B&W suits it so well.
Bill Phillips: I have included a couple of colour ones art the end of the series
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet
  • 1 Aug 2012, 05:26
Another fine shot mate, a bit dingy in there though.
Bill Phillips: Bright and cheery wouldn't work really
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 1 Aug 2012, 06:36
Oh, these bags (for washing or books...?) might tell some life story - I like this photo - there is also a feel of tristesse.
Bill Phillips: They had slates and chalk in the bags. The children were kept away from their parents who were considered a bad influence so I imagine they were not very happy
  • Chris
  • England
  • 1 Aug 2012, 07:07
True: outside they might have starved
Bill Phillips: It is difficult looking at a 19th century solution with 21st century eyes. The Daily Mail would love the idea of the Workhouse I suspect
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 1 Aug 2012, 07:29
I can remember old people in my childhood who still had a fear of the Workhouse, even when they had been converted into hopsitals
Bill Phillips: I was surprised to learn they were only finally abolished with the advent of the welfare state in 1948
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 1 Aug 2012, 07:48
I wonder how many of them went blind young, Bill?!
Bill Phillips: I have no idea Ginnie
Another fine shot Sir.
Bill Phillips: I am obliged to you young Shaw
No sparing of the candles on this one, another fine image.
Bill Phillips: Thanks John.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 1 Aug 2012, 08:17
You are doing some fabulous series of pictures here.
Love it, a likey to me.
Bill Phillips: Oh Lady P how great for me
that you bestow a fine likey.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 1 Aug 2012, 08:18
The workhouse seemed luxurious I'm sure in comparison to life outside in some cases.
Bill Phillips: Almost certainly true, particularly for some of the old folk but I doubt it was much fun even for them
  • Richard T
  • Suffolk till the end of the month.
  • 1 Aug 2012, 08:23
Some kids call school ''the work house'' as they get dropped off at school, by mummy in the BMW 4 by 4.

A very fine series developing Bill.
Bill Phillips: They have no idea
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 1 Aug 2012, 08:55
Slates were very eco friendly, but a bit heavy to lug around! Another fine photo Bill.
Bill Phillips: The ipad of its day Mike
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 1 Aug 2012, 08:55
We know such workhouses here too, August Hermann Francke in Halle (Francksche Stiftung) and Hinrich Wichern (Innere Mission) in Hamburg were great charity persons who helped the poor workers's children, the street children, the orphan children... to find a new, better life ...Even today there are homes to keep children away from their parents or mothers (for example prostitutes...). I had some pupils at my school who lived in a home taken far away from their parents.
I would like to read the book about the workhouses Angela had read as you wrote.
Bill Phillips: The primary aim was to reduce the cost of Poor relief which fell on the Parishes. They were harsh places I think. The book was in one of our book sales and i'm not sure if we still have it. i'll ask Ange what it was called.
They look more like nose bags for the horses Bill.
Bill Phillips: Hahahha...actually you are right Peter smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 1 Aug 2012, 10:35
Excellent again. Must say, you are a quick learner and Ebbie didn't waste his time. Likey.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Louis I'm pleased you likey this wink
Another fine one in the series, Bill! Reminds me of my school days wink
Bill Phillips: I remember using a pen you had to dip in an inkwell on the desk. Being left handed it was a nightmare!!
The somber tone of this image captures the feeling of the place very well, Bill. I guess receiving a basic education would have been one of the more positive aspects of the workhouse.
Bill Phillips: I think they segregated the families so that the children could benefit fro the good example of eduction. Harsh but perhaps it worked for some
It looks to have been kitted out with the right stuff Bill.
Bill Phillips: Learning to read and write was something that might have given these kids a chance in life...they should try it now grin
A suitably gloomy treatment Bill for gloomy times! smile
Bill Phillips: It was hard for most people.
Probably the only good thing about the workhouse, Bill
Bill Phillips: And even that came at the price of being separated from your parents

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