yellowbear

03 Mar 2012 66 views
 
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photoblog image Guildhall Worcester

Guildhall Worcester

The Guildhall was erected on the site of an earlier civic building in 1724, and has been a forum for judicial and formal occasions for both town and county ever since.
From medieval times the city was a vital regional centre of commerce and power-broking. Following the skirmishes between the army of King Charles I and Parliamentary forces in 1642, Worcester enhanced its reputation as the “the Faithful City”, though some would argue that the average Worcester man or woman in the street merely kept their heads down hoping for peace, health and prosperity, whoever might provide such rare commodities.
We can discover the breadth of the Guildhall’s function by scanning Turberville’s 19th century history of the county: 1838 – the poor treated to a dinner to celebrate Her Majesty’s coronation; 1839 – Robert Owen censured for his speech promoting the Chartists; 1840 – a ball held in honour of Queen Victoria’s marriage; 1844 – Oxford and Worcester Railway Company shareholders resolved to proceed vigorously with their planned line; 1848 – meeting of citizens condemned the use of capital punishment by county judges.
Demonstrable loyalty to the Crown has ensured Worcester maintains vital status in the form of royal charters. The Guildhall has been the venue for the public presentation of many of these iconic gifts, and some of the original documents (or very convincing replicas) are still held in the
Georgian building, under impressive security conditions.
The Mayor’s Parlour is a fine oak-panelled chamber within the Guildhall, combining office space and an array of impressive memorabilia. Recent Mayors have been determined to spotlight the artefacts of the noble history of the city.

Guildhall Worcester

The Guildhall was erected on the site of an earlier civic building in 1724, and has been a forum for judicial and formal occasions for both town and county ever since.
From medieval times the city was a vital regional centre of commerce and power-broking. Following the skirmishes between the army of King Charles I and Parliamentary forces in 1642, Worcester enhanced its reputation as the “the Faithful City”, though some would argue that the average Worcester man or woman in the street merely kept their heads down hoping for peace, health and prosperity, whoever might provide such rare commodities.
We can discover the breadth of the Guildhall’s function by scanning Turberville’s 19th century history of the county: 1838 – the poor treated to a dinner to celebrate Her Majesty’s coronation; 1839 – Robert Owen censured for his speech promoting the Chartists; 1840 – a ball held in honour of Queen Victoria’s marriage; 1844 – Oxford and Worcester Railway Company shareholders resolved to proceed vigorously with their planned line; 1848 – meeting of citizens condemned the use of capital punishment by county judges.
Demonstrable loyalty to the Crown has ensured Worcester maintains vital status in the form of royal charters. The Guildhall has been the venue for the public presentation of many of these iconic gifts, and some of the original documents (or very convincing replicas) are still held in the
Georgian building, under impressive security conditions.
The Mayor’s Parlour is a fine oak-panelled chamber within the Guildhall, combining office space and an array of impressive memorabilia. Recent Mayors have been determined to spotlight the artefacts of the noble history of the city.

comments (12)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 3 Mar 2012, 01:42
Excellent!

If you fall over on your back then you can be assured of a fine view to assist you in re-focussing your eyes.
Bill Phillips: I think I would just lie there and enjoy the view Ray!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 3 Mar 2012, 06:56
Lovely room, interesting history, questionable fashions
Bill Phillips: They were a lot of re-enactors (is there such a word) about
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 3 Mar 2012, 07:19
Oh ja, a very impressive Guildhall- and what a beautiful ceiling! We are in England, that's sure! I was expecting to see you and the Lions Club doing some charity activities.
Bill Phillips: This was a lot of people who do historical re-enactment so there were Cavaliers and Roundheads and French revolutionaries alongside Unionist and confederates...very colourful
The thumb looked like an umbrella ... but I better not describe the apparel of lady on the right as such.
Bill Phillips: I reckon she was on castors
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 3 Mar 2012, 09:13
Phew - normality has been resumed ;o) This is indeed an impressive room Bill - do we get to see the parlour?
Bill Phillips: sadly no. The Guildhall is one of Worcester's finest buildings and I have yet to get to see the Mayor's parlour!
That is certainly a beautiful room.
Bill Phillips: It is magnificent Mary. This picture far from does it justice
Looks like one of those long rooms in old houses Bill where they would walk in wet weather.
Bill Phillips: I know what you mean. They were popular in Tudor and Elizabethan buildings.
Stunning!
Bill Phillips: It is a beautiful building LC
A beautiful room indeed Bill. Thanks for the history words!
Bill Phillips: I think the Guildhall is amongst the very best of the buildings in Worcester Richard
Magnificent ceiling isn't it. Was this some sort of exhibition?
Bill Phillips: They had a day of re-enactments with all sorts of groups from the civil war to WW2 !
Great capture of a wonderful interior Bill.
Bill Phillips: It is stunning Fred and this picture doesn't do it justice
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Mar 2012, 19:25
Ye selling books here? Impressive mayor's parlour. Our Shavaton went quite well. I just loved harassing the public for their money.
Bill Phillips: Sadly no. Our venue is more prosaic being in the Parish centre next to St Andrew's church in Droitwich (Which, to be fair, is a grade 1 listed building. There are book sales in the Guildhall though. We like harassing the public for their money too. most pay up cheerfully

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