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12 Apr 2011 191 views
 
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photoblog image Buckland Abbey

Buckland Abbey

Sir Francis Drake was born only a few miles from Yelverton near Tavistock where the remains of a great Benedictine Monastery founded around 974 by the Saxon King Edgar can still be seen. Drake’s first exploits were associated with seafaring and it was in 1566 that he sailed to the Spanish Main for the first time. It was also from Plymouth that Drake with the permission of Queen Elizabeth I sailed on 13 December 1577 in the ‘Pelican’, later renamed the ‘Golden Hind’, on a 3 year voyage that circumnavigated the world. During this voyage he claimed on 17 June 1579 for the Queen the land of ‘Nova Albion’, believed to have been at Drake’s Bay in California but now thought to be in Oregon some 500 miles further north at Whale Cove.

From the treasures amassed on his voyage the Queen, through gifts, made Drake a rich man enabling him to buy a substantial house. His choice was a property near Yelverton called Buckland Abbey which today is run by the National Trust. The name Buckland means ‘land in the book’, that is land held by Royal Charter in this case from 1278 until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by the Cistercian Monks. The monastic church was converted into a home by Sir Richard Grenville who like Drake was a West Country man. It was this gentleman who in August 1585 founded a colony in America on Roanoke Island off the coast of North Carolina. Sadly, for various reasons, the colony failed and was facing starvation when it was unexpectedly rescued by Sir Francis Drake in June 1586. On 24 April 1581 the Golden Hind was moored in London when the Queen came on board and had Drake knighted by the French Ambassador. The 2 Royal Standards that flew on the ship that day are on display at Buckland Abbey as is the 16th century side drum believed to have been used on his last expedition in 1595 and known as Drake’s Drum.

 

The above pictures are of the great barn at Buckland Abbey.

Buckland Abbey

Sir Francis Drake was born only a few miles from Yelverton near Tavistock where the remains of a great Benedictine Monastery founded around 974 by the Saxon King Edgar can still be seen. Drake’s first exploits were associated with seafaring and it was in 1566 that he sailed to the Spanish Main for the first time. It was also from Plymouth that Drake with the permission of Queen Elizabeth I sailed on 13 December 1577 in the ‘Pelican’, later renamed the ‘Golden Hind’, on a 3 year voyage that circumnavigated the world. During this voyage he claimed on 17 June 1579 for the Queen the land of ‘Nova Albion’, believed to have been at Drake’s Bay in California but now thought to be in Oregon some 500 miles further north at Whale Cove.

From the treasures amassed on his voyage the Queen, through gifts, made Drake a rich man enabling him to buy a substantial house. His choice was a property near Yelverton called Buckland Abbey which today is run by the National Trust. The name Buckland means ‘land in the book’, that is land held by Royal Charter in this case from 1278 until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by the Cistercian Monks. The monastic church was converted into a home by Sir Richard Grenville who like Drake was a West Country man. It was this gentleman who in August 1585 founded a colony in America on Roanoke Island off the coast of North Carolina. Sadly, for various reasons, the colony failed and was facing starvation when it was unexpectedly rescued by Sir Francis Drake in June 1586. On 24 April 1581 the Golden Hind was moored in London when the Queen came on board and had Drake knighted by the French Ambassador. The 2 Royal Standards that flew on the ship that day are on display at Buckland Abbey as is the 16th century side drum believed to have been used on his last expedition in 1595 and known as Drake’s Drum.

 

The above pictures are of the great barn at Buckland Abbey.

comments (24)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 12 Apr 2011, 00:40
Excellent
Bill Phillips: Thanks very much mate!
Interesting historical account of this place Bill. This definitely is a great barn, amazing how well this was constructed. Excellent B&W image that brings out the details.
Bill Phillips: Thanks John. It is a massive barn
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 12 Apr 2011, 01:43
Superb montage, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Cheers Ray. It is a big bugger!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 12 Apr 2011, 07:13
What a great barn referring to Drake's wealth and "treasures amassed on his voyages" -a fine montage!
I met Sir Francis Drake in Plymouth on the Horse Shoe where you can feel the breath of the great English world history - and more privately in the Ship's Inn in Exeter - one of the really great British personalities - and I liked reading your information!
Bill Phillips: I have fond memories of the Ship Inn in Exeter, including over indulging on my Brother's stag night some 40 odd years ago!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 12 Apr 2011, 07:16
Excellent pictures and text: I take back a lot of what I said about you
Bill Phillips: but only the good things
The boy done well ...
Bill Phillips: Old Frannie did alright!
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 Apr 2011, 08:38
The light from the door way really brings out the fine structure of the roof. More good B&W - I shall have to up my game ;o)
Bill Phillips: Thanks Mike. Colour tomorrow and then a couple more b&w...I think i'm getting hooked!
  • Chad Doveton
  • Where latitude and longitude meet.
  • 12 Apr 2011, 08:58
If he used this for indoor bowls he could have one game being set up whilst playing another.
Bill Phillips: That thought had not occurred to me Chad and I thank you for it
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 12 Apr 2011, 09:40
Lol at Chad- yes, we tourists listened also to the following legend, of course, that every English schoolchild might have heard of: "When the Spanish Armada was sighted on 19 July 1588 Drake was playing a game of bowls on Plymouth Hoe. Legend has it that he finished the game boarding the Revenge."
Bill Phillips: I believe that the game he would actually have been playing might actually have been the French Game of Boule
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 Apr 2011, 09:42
Interesting to see both ends of the room at once. You really are getting rather good at this b/w!
Bill Phillips: LOL....I have got old Blackie worried. This seemed the easiest way of getting over the size of the place especially as the difference in light would have been very difficult without a tripod and about 30 exposures bracketed and then all this HDR stuff....I haven't got the patience for all that!
  • Chantal
  • Nederland
  • 12 Apr 2011, 10:58
great way to present this duet
Bill Phillips: Thanks chantal.
You are the master of black and white Bill, I must try more of this sort of thing myself.
Bill Phillips: Beware Stanley, it is addictive
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 12 Apr 2011, 11:49
It is a great barn but it only has a small fireplace. It has a very unusual V-shape, though. I've seen the Golden Hind moored in a dock on the river Thames; handy for a pub from what I remember.
Bill Phillips: Sigh.............................
A nice joining, I think I prefer the more contrasty left.
Bill Phillips: It shows the roof off to better effect
Very well presented and very intresting text.Works great in b&w.
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Laurette.
Two really fine shots that give a good idea of what this old barn looks like. It was interesting to read about the meaning of Buckland, this place, as you will see is only just over 4 miles from where I was born, I have driven through it many times http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckland,_Hertfordshire
Bill Phillips: This is the Buckland in Devon Brian, but I imagine it has the same meaning in Hertfordshire
Excellent and dramatic combining of aspects.
Bill Phillips: Thank you very much Sheila
Nice light in both of them. Quite historical there by the sound of it. My computer is acting strangely so if you get this in duplicate that's why
Bill Phillips: Very much part of our History Janet. One more of the greats from the West country.
Really good history and images to go with it, good detail too! in both smile
Bill Phillips: Cheers Linda
A fine old barn, well presented, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Yes it is some barn!
  • Peter
  • Canada
  • 12 Apr 2011, 21:58
Which way to turn....fantastic montage Bill....great history lesson aslo....petersmile
Bill Phillips: This country has a lot of History though sometimes it seems not much of a future!
  • Gloeb
  • United States
  • 13 Apr 2011, 02:40
Wow! wow! fantastic shots and thanks for the historical info..quite fascinating indeed!!!
wow, this is cool.....
photographer heaven
Bill Phillips: It was indeed Rob
the lighting is quite good, i like the stark contrasts in b/w. also interesting read alongwith
Bill Phillips: Thanks very much ayush

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