yellowbear

17 Apr 2018 95 views
 
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photoblog image Weeping Window

Weeping Window

Poppies: Weeping Window is a cascade comprising several thousand handmade ceramic poppies.

The men and women of Herefordshire made a huge contribution to the war effort during the First World War in a variety of ways. Young men were recruited into the Herefordshire Regiment, which expanded to three battalions during this time, landing in Suvla Bay in Gallipoli in August 1915 before being transferred to the Western Front in 1918. Shells were produced at the Rotherwas Munitions Factory, which saw an influx of thousands of women into the county. Shell filling began on 11 November 1916. Herefordshire also provided horses for the front, known as ‘remounts’, as well as providing food supplies for the nation and the front from farms across the rural county.

Hereford Cathedral dates from 1120 and is renowned for being the home of the Mappa Mundi, 1217 Magna Carta and a unique Chained Library. First World War memorials in the cathedral include a plaque commemorating men of all ranks of the Herefordshire Regiment who died on campaigns in Egypt, Gallipoli, Palestine and France, and one to Hereford Cathedral School students and staff, including four former choristers. A Book of Remembrance for the husbands and sons of members of the Hereford Mothers’ Union who gave their lives in the war is on permanent display. In 2018, Hereford Cathedral will unveil a new plaque honouring soldier Allan Leonard Lewis, the only Herefordshire-born recipient of the Victoria Cross. Lewis was killed in September 1918, aged 23.The Victoria Cross was presented to his parents by H.M King George V at Buckingham Palace in April 1919.

Weeping Window

Poppies: Weeping Window is a cascade comprising several thousand handmade ceramic poppies.

The men and women of Herefordshire made a huge contribution to the war effort during the First World War in a variety of ways. Young men were recruited into the Herefordshire Regiment, which expanded to three battalions during this time, landing in Suvla Bay in Gallipoli in August 1915 before being transferred to the Western Front in 1918. Shells were produced at the Rotherwas Munitions Factory, which saw an influx of thousands of women into the county. Shell filling began on 11 November 1916. Herefordshire also provided horses for the front, known as ‘remounts’, as well as providing food supplies for the nation and the front from farms across the rural county.

Hereford Cathedral dates from 1120 and is renowned for being the home of the Mappa Mundi, 1217 Magna Carta and a unique Chained Library. First World War memorials in the cathedral include a plaque commemorating men of all ranks of the Herefordshire Regiment who died on campaigns in Egypt, Gallipoli, Palestine and France, and one to Hereford Cathedral School students and staff, including four former choristers. A Book of Remembrance for the husbands and sons of members of the Hereford Mothers’ Union who gave their lives in the war is on permanent display. In 2018, Hereford Cathedral will unveil a new plaque honouring soldier Allan Leonard Lewis, the only Herefordshire-born recipient of the Victoria Cross. Lewis was killed in September 1918, aged 23.The Victoria Cross was presented to his parents by H.M King George V at Buckingham Palace in April 1919.

comments (16)

Beautiful color pouring down...
Bill Phillips: It is a poignant tribute Larry
  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 17 Apr 2018, 00:34
Red Ants ascending...
Bill Phillips: or descending
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
  • 17 Apr 2018, 02:36
an honorable sacrifice and what an amazing tribute

so beautifully photographed
Bill Phillips: There was a terrible sacrifice in WW1 on both sides and in a senseless war
A wonderful tribute, we saw the one at the tower of London, you got a good shot of it, Bill.
Bill Phillips: There has been a tour of these poppies. Hereford I think is the penultimate one with the last one being Carlisle.
This is an incredible tribute - so beautiful and poignant.
Bill Phillips: It is very poignant E. uch senseless slaughter
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 17 Apr 2018, 06:45
Clever stuff isn't it, speaks a thousand words..
Bill Phillips: It is impressive and certainly draws the crowds
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 17 Apr 2018, 06:52
There was something similar on St Magnis Cathedral, Orkney last may and there's another now at Fort Nelson near Gosport. They make for impressive and a thought-provoking display.
Bill Phillips: The poppies have been touring the country. Hereford is I think the penultimate one with the final one being at Carlisle cathedral.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 17 Apr 2018, 07:19
A very touching memorial - I remember these poppies at the Tower in London.
Bill Phillips: There has been a tour of poppy installations around the country. It is a fine memorial to the senseless slaughter of WW1
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 17 Apr 2018, 08:10
Verneffective a d too pretty in my book, considering the meaning. I would rather a tip up truck dump them on the doorstep of Buckingham Palace with a note telling them that this was what happens when Royal cousins fall out.
Bill Phillips: A slight oversimplification of the senseless slaughter of WW1. We are currently watching two megalomaniacs trying to sleepwalk into another major conflagration. Our dimwit government is posing and making noises about morals....huh! No problem supplying weapons to the Saudis to slaughter people in the Yemen. But if course the Saudis are our allies...so that's alright then
Is this still showing? I thought it was marvelous when first displayed.
Bill Phillips: The original display was at the Tower of London. A display has been touring the country this website will give you more info
https://www.1418now.org.uk/commissions/poppies/
  • Richard Trim
  • Suffolk : where the sun rises first in England
  • 17 Apr 2018, 13:07
A difficult one to comment on ..but it is spectacular
Bill Phillips: for me there is a distinction between the people who caused the war and those who suffered as a result of the failure of the so called leaders of the time. If this in any way glorified war it would be unacceptable to me. If it marks the suffering and sacrifice of ordinary people then it is fine
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 Apr 2018, 13:37
An amazing tribute
Bill Phillips: It is a fine display.
A fine shot Bill, they really look good. These Poppies were made for the Tower of London presentation quite near to us and the designer and people who made them featured on our local TV quite a lot at the time.
Bill Phillips: It was an impressive sight Brian
Wonderful idea!
Bill Phillips: I was impressed by it. I have never been impressed by the failure that led to WW1
Impressive, I imagine the work done to arrange them all along the facade. Eight the chosen framing
Bill Phillips: It is technically very clever Calusio and the result is as you say impressive
beautiful gift from the people of the parish and town. Thank you for the REST OF THE STORY Bill.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera PENTAX K-3 II
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/250s
aperture f/5.6
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 10.0mm
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