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20 May 2010 201 views
 
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photoblog image Salwarpe Church

Salwarpe Church

The church of ST. MICHAEL consists of a chancel 28 ft. 6 in. by 16 ft. 9 in., north vestry, nave averaging 54 ft. by 15 ft. 11 in., north aisle 10 ft. 11 in. wide, south aisle 9 ft. 11 in. wide, west tower 11 ft. 11 in. square, and south porch. These measurements are all internal.

The earliest part of the present church is the nave arcade, dating from the 12th century. The north aisle is mid-14th-century work, and the south of a few years later.

Traces of flying buttresses on the walls of both aisles, and carried across to the western piers, seem to point to the existence of a tower earlier than the present aisles, whose eastern arch, at some date after 1350, was in danger of spreading. The north and south walls of this tower being within the church would have formed bays similar to those of the arcade, but not in line with them.

In the middle of the 15th century a new tower was built immediately to the west of the older one, but not connected with it and not in line with the nave and previous tower. The older tower was then removed and the new one connected with the west ends of the aisle walls, and finally the north and south arches of the old tower were replaced by a continuation of the nave arcade built outside them. In order to keep these new bays of approximately equal width the responds were necessarily of unequal projection, and part of the last pier on the south side was cut away.

Information from British history online.

Salwarpe Church

The church of ST. MICHAEL consists of a chancel 28 ft. 6 in. by 16 ft. 9 in., north vestry, nave averaging 54 ft. by 15 ft. 11 in., north aisle 10 ft. 11 in. wide, south aisle 9 ft. 11 in. wide, west tower 11 ft. 11 in. square, and south porch. These measurements are all internal.

The earliest part of the present church is the nave arcade, dating from the 12th century. The north aisle is mid-14th-century work, and the south of a few years later.

Traces of flying buttresses on the walls of both aisles, and carried across to the western piers, seem to point to the existence of a tower earlier than the present aisles, whose eastern arch, at some date after 1350, was in danger of spreading. The north and south walls of this tower being within the church would have formed bays similar to those of the arcade, but not in line with them.

In the middle of the 15th century a new tower was built immediately to the west of the older one, but not connected with it and not in line with the nave and previous tower. The older tower was then removed and the new one connected with the west ends of the aisle walls, and finally the north and south arches of the old tower were replaced by a continuation of the nave arcade built outside them. In order to keep these new bays of approximately equal width the responds were necessarily of unequal projection, and part of the last pier on the south side was cut away.

Information from British history online.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 20 May 2010, 01:07
I wonder if the flying buttresses were part of the design, or an emergency repair job?

Really like the leafy arrangement here, Bill.
Bill Phillips: Probably part of the design Ray.
beautiful old church. really like the shot through the graveyard smile
Bill Phillips: It is rather nice and we have a lot of village churches in Worcestershire
  • Chris
  • England
  • 20 May 2010, 07:11
Thank you for this: it looks as if it was taken not too long ago. Where is Salwarpe? Never heard of it!
Bill Phillips: It was bout this time last year. Salwarpe is a village close to Droitwich
Good time of the year to snap churches ....

richard
Bill Phillips: This was last year but about this time of year
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 20 May 2010, 07:19
a peaceful atmosphere on a sunny springday - life and death belong together. I really like this photo ful of light and shadow!
Bill Phillips: We like wandering around churches and churchyards. The infinate variety is amazing
Wonderful capture Bill. I really like the atmosphere!
Bill Phillips: It did have a nice feel to it.
I love the light around the grave stone cross.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Mary
Looks great in this setting with the sunlight on the trees and grass giving that lovely green to set it off Bill. Good shot
Bill Phillips: Thank you Janet, pleased you like it
Beautiful shot framed with the tree and glorious sunshinesmile
Bill Phillips: Thanks very much Linda
Great lighting for this shot Bill. The framing trees finish it nicely.
Bill Phillips: Thanks Ron
delightful comp/light Billsmile
Bill Phillips: Cheers Tim
I agree with Richard, the conditions were ideal for taking this delightful church Bill.
Bill Phillips: A nice spring day last year Brian
You hit it on a lovely day, Bill
Bill Phillips: It was indeed Tom
Looks like a real English country scene.
Bill Phillips: It does indeed Sheila

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